2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161165
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of U. S. Army Basic Training on Attitudes Toward Domestic Violence
Abstract:
Effects of U. S. Army Basic Training on Attitudes Toward Domestic Violence
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hendrix, Teresa, MSN, BSN, CNM
P.I. Institution Name:Ohio State University
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1052 Lambeth Drive, Columbus, OH, 43220, USA
Contact Telephone:614 457-5743
Violence against women is a United States' and world-wide public
health priority. Data suggests predictable and distinguishable medical and
psychological sequelae of violence toward women. Adverse affects continue
throughout life. The United States' Army has a unique culture where
hegemonic masculinity is a central defining concept. It is suggested that
there is a link between a culture that values masculinity and domestic
violence, and a link between the male bonding that occurs in the military
and abuse of women. The study is based on Ajzen's Theory of Planned
Behavior and compares the results of the Hypermasculinity Inventory Scale,
the Domestic Violence Myth Acceptance Scales and salivary testosterone
levels before and after U. S. Army Basic Training at Fort Jackson, South
Carolina. Comparisons will be made between testosterone levels before and
after the 10 week training. Correlations of testosterone levels to the
scores on the Hypermasculinity Inventory Scale and the Domestic Violence
Myth Acceptance Scale will be explored. A paired t-test will be used to
compare scores on the Hypermasculinity Inventory Scale and the Domestic
Violence Myth Acceptance Scale before and after training. Subjects are
volunteers who are entering U. S. Army basic training. Nurses are often
the first to recognize domestic violence victims and address the issues.
As reservists return from deployment in the war against terror, spouses
will be seeking treatment in non military health treatment facilities. If
an association exists between military training and domestic violence,
health care providers will be better prepared to address this and develop
appropriate intervention programs. This is a study in progress.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of U. S. Army Basic Training on Attitudes Toward Domestic Violenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161165-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of U. S. Army Basic Training on Attitudes Toward Domestic Violence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hendrix, Teresa, MSN, BSN, CNM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1052 Lambeth Drive, Columbus, OH, 43220, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">614 457-5743</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hendrix.29@osu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Violence against women is a United States' and world-wide public <br/> health priority. Data suggests predictable and distinguishable medical and <br/> psychological sequelae of violence toward women. Adverse affects continue <br/> throughout life. The United States' Army has a unique culture where <br/> hegemonic masculinity is a central defining concept. It is suggested that <br/> there is a link between a culture that values masculinity and domestic <br/> violence, and a link between the male bonding that occurs in the military <br/> and abuse of women. The study is based on Ajzen's Theory of Planned <br/> Behavior and compares the results of the Hypermasculinity Inventory Scale, <br/> the Domestic Violence Myth Acceptance Scales and salivary testosterone <br/> levels before and after U. S. Army Basic Training at Fort Jackson, South <br/> Carolina. Comparisons will be made between testosterone levels before and <br/> after the 10 week training. Correlations of testosterone levels to the <br/> scores on the Hypermasculinity Inventory Scale and the Domestic Violence <br/> Myth Acceptance Scale will be explored. A paired t-test will be used to <br/> compare scores on the Hypermasculinity Inventory Scale and the Domestic <br/> Violence Myth Acceptance Scale before and after training. Subjects are <br/> volunteers who are entering U. S. Army basic training. Nurses are often <br/> the first to recognize domestic violence victims and address the issues. <br/> As reservists return from deployment in the war against terror, spouses <br/> will be seeking treatment in non military health treatment facilities. If <br/> an association exists between military training and domestic violence, <br/> health care providers will be better prepared to address this and develop <br/> appropriate intervention programs. This is a study in progress.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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