Perceived Autonomy and Self-Care Resources in Older Residents of Senior Apartments

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161167
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived Autonomy and Self-Care Resources in Older Residents of Senior Apartments
Abstract:
Perceived Autonomy and Self-Care Resources in Older Residents of Senior Apartments
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hertz, Judith, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Illinois University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1240 Normal Road, Dekalb, IL, 60115, USA
Contact Telephone:815/753-0662
Purpose: The goal of this study was to examine relationships between
Perceived Enactment of Autonomy (PEA) and selected self-care resources in
older adults residing in senior apartments. Significance: The majority of
older adults live in the community and a growing number of them live in
community-based congregate housing in the form of senior apartments.
However, there is a dearth of research with that population. A better
understanding of factors influencing senior apartment residentsÆ abilities
to self-direct their lives and care for themselves is needed as a basis
for planning health promotion interventions. Theoretical Framework: A
midrange theory of self-care (Erickson, Tomlin, & Swain, 1988) guided the
study. Within this theory, PEA represents the potential for self-care
action. PEA is the perception of caring for oneself by mobilizing
available resources and making choices based on personal needs, goals, and
values. Persons can perceive a high level of autonomy even when they
choose to depend on others. Participants: A convenience sample of 158
adults with a mean age of 79.7 years (SD=7.4, range=60 û 95) was recruited
from 14 senior apartment buildings in Illinois. Methods: A
cross-sectional, correlational design was used in this study. Participants
completed five written questionnaires, which measured PEA, social support,
psychosocial developmental residuals, perceived health, and selected
demographic variables. Three hypotheses were tested and focused on
relationships between PEA and (a) social support, (b) psychosocial
developmental residuals, and (c) perceived health. Results: Significant
correlations were found between PEA and: (a) social support (r=.182,
p=.05) and (b) psychosocial developmental residuals (r=.566, p=.01).
Surprisingly, PEA and perceived health were not related, r=.06.
Conclusions: Implications for theory development, future studies, the
development of autonomy-supportive health promotion interventions, and
health policy will be discussed.
The John A. Hartford Foundation Building Academic Geriatric Nursing
Capacity Scholars program funded this study
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived Autonomy and Self-Care Resources in Older Residents of Senior Apartmentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161167-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceived Autonomy and Self-Care Resources in Older Residents of Senior Apartments</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hertz, Judith, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Illinois University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1240 Normal Road, Dekalb, IL, 60115, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">815/753-0662</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jhertz@niu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The goal of this study was to examine relationships between <br/> Perceived Enactment of Autonomy (PEA) and selected self-care resources in <br/> older adults residing in senior apartments. Significance: The majority of <br/> older adults live in the community and a growing number of them live in <br/> community-based congregate housing in the form of senior apartments. <br/> However, there is a dearth of research with that population. A better <br/> understanding of factors influencing senior apartment residents&AElig; abilities <br/> to self-direct their lives and care for themselves is needed as a basis <br/> for planning health promotion interventions. Theoretical Framework: A <br/> midrange theory of self-care (Erickson, Tomlin, &amp; Swain, 1988) guided the <br/> study. Within this theory, PEA represents the potential for self-care <br/> action. PEA is the perception of caring for oneself by mobilizing <br/> available resources and making choices based on personal needs, goals, and <br/> values. Persons can perceive a high level of autonomy even when they <br/> choose to depend on others. Participants: A convenience sample of 158 <br/> adults with a mean age of 79.7 years (SD=7.4, range=60 &ucirc; 95) was recruited <br/> from 14 senior apartment buildings in Illinois. Methods: A <br/> cross-sectional, correlational design was used in this study. Participants <br/> completed five written questionnaires, which measured PEA, social support, <br/> psychosocial developmental residuals, perceived health, and selected <br/> demographic variables. Three hypotheses were tested and focused on <br/> relationships between PEA and (a) social support, (b) psychosocial <br/> developmental residuals, and (c) perceived health. Results: Significant <br/> correlations were found between PEA and: (a) social support (r=.182, <br/> p=.05) and (b) psychosocial developmental residuals (r=.566, p=.01). <br/> Surprisingly, PEA and perceived health were not related, r=.06. <br/> Conclusions: Implications for theory development, future studies, the <br/> development of autonomy-supportive health promotion interventions, and <br/> health policy will be discussed. <br/> The John A. Hartford Foundation Building Academic Geriatric Nursing <br/> Capacity Scholars program funded this study</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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