2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161170
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Under Construction: Using Simulations to Design Experiential Nursing Education
Abstract:
Under Construction: Using Simulations to Design Experiential Nursing Education
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Jeffries, Pamela, DNS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317-274-8092
Purpose: One of the most important challenges for a nurse educator is
to develop efficient and effective methods to teach a diverse population
of students decision-making, problem-solving, and critical thinking
skills. Providing simulations in nursing education is a relatively
efficient method of teaching content and the skills of decision-making and
problem-solving. Gaining an understanding of the process of designing,
implementing, and evaluating simulations in nursing can be facilitated by
a theoretical framework that specifies the variables and their
relationships. Furthermore, an empirically supported framework and valid
and reliable measures of the variables will help guide the design,
implementation, and evaluation of simulations in nursing education and of
simulation research. Methodology: An exploratory study was conducted
across 8 sites to test simulation design characteristics and educational
practices that are components of the proposed simulation framework.
Following a review of the literature that identified a lack of specific
instruments appropriate to test variables in the simulation framework, two
new instruments were designed and tested: The Educational Practices Scale
for Simulation (EPSS) and the Simulation Design Scale (SDS). Results: The
SDS and the EPSS were each analyzed using factor analyses with varimax
rotation. The simulation design feature found most important in a sample
of 380 nursing students was debriefing and the most important educational
practice that was feedback. Nursing Implications: Using an empirically
supported simulation framework to assist in identifying important and
effective design features when developing and implementing simulations for
nursing education in schools or clinical agencies is very helpful and
assures better outcomes. Furthermore, when designing and implementing
simulations of all types, debriefing after the simulation experience is
very important to the studentsÆ learning in addition to feedback from the
instructor during the simulation experience.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnder Construction: Using Simulations to Design Experiential Nursing Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161170-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Under Construction: Using Simulations to Design Experiential Nursing Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jeffries, Pamela, DNS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317-274-8092</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">prjeffri@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: One of the most important challenges for a nurse educator is <br/> to develop efficient and effective methods to teach a diverse population <br/> of students decision-making, problem-solving, and critical thinking <br/> skills. Providing simulations in nursing education is a relatively <br/> efficient method of teaching content and the skills of decision-making and <br/> problem-solving. Gaining an understanding of the process of designing, <br/> implementing, and evaluating simulations in nursing can be facilitated by <br/> a theoretical framework that specifies the variables and their <br/> relationships. Furthermore, an empirically supported framework and valid <br/> and reliable measures of the variables will help guide the design, <br/> implementation, and evaluation of simulations in nursing education and of <br/> simulation research. Methodology: An exploratory study was conducted <br/> across 8 sites to test simulation design characteristics and educational <br/> practices that are components of the proposed simulation framework. <br/> Following a review of the literature that identified a lack of specific <br/> instruments appropriate to test variables in the simulation framework, two <br/> new instruments were designed and tested: The Educational Practices Scale <br/> for Simulation (EPSS) and the Simulation Design Scale (SDS). Results: The <br/> SDS and the EPSS were each analyzed using factor analyses with varimax <br/> rotation. The simulation design feature found most important in a sample <br/> of 380 nursing students was debriefing and the most important educational <br/> practice that was feedback. Nursing Implications: Using an empirically <br/> supported simulation framework to assist in identifying important and <br/> effective design features when developing and implementing simulations for <br/> nursing education in schools or clinical agencies is very helpful and <br/> assures better outcomes. Furthermore, when designing and implementing <br/> simulations of all types, debriefing after the simulation experience is <br/> very important to the studentsÆ learning in addition to feedback from the <br/> instructor during the simulation experience.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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