2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161175
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ethic Patterns with Satisfaction with End of Life Care
Abstract:
Ethic Patterns with Satisfaction with End of Life Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kelley, Carol, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-8855
Co-Authors:Barbara J. Daly, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Sara L Douglas, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; and Theresa Standing, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor
The chronically critically ill (CCI) are a recently recognized and
growing population of patients who have endured prolonged periods of
mechanical ventilation and have a one year mortality rate of 60%. Family
caregivers play a significant role in decision making for CCI individuals
and are intimately involved at life's end. The purpose of this study was
to describe and examine relationships between Caucasian and African
American (AA) family caregivers' perceptions of satisfaction with and
preparation for end of life care. This study was part of a large
randomized post-discharge disease management project. Interviews were
conducted with 37 caregivers of CCI patients 3-4 months after death.
Sixty-two percent of the patients and caregivers were Caucasian. The
majority of Caucasian caregivers were spouses and children while the
majority of AA caregivers were children and parents to those who died.
Both AA caregivers (mean age 50) and the patients (mean age 62) who died
were younger than Caucasian caregivers (mean age 56) and patients (mean
age 69). Approximately half of the patients were on mechanical ventilation
at the time of death, and 57% of AA patients had CPR compared to 17% of
Caucasian patients which was statistically significant. Satisfaction and
preparation were pilot tested with questions from TenoÆs After-Death
Bereaved Family Member Interview. Chi square and t-tests were used to
compare the experiences of AA and Caucasian caregivers. There were
statistically significant differences between AA and Caucasian family
caregivers in the area of being informed of the patient's condition and
feeling confident about what to do at the time of death. There was a
statistically significant positive relationship between satisfaction and
preparation for AA caregivers but not for Caucasian caregivers. Health
care providers should be sensitive to potential differences between
Caucasian and AA family caregivers in providing end of life care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEthic Patterns with Satisfaction with End of Life Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161175-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ethic Patterns with Satisfaction with End of Life Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kelley, Carol, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-8855</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carol.kelley@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara J. Daly, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Sara L Douglas, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; and Theresa Standing, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The chronically critically ill (CCI) are a recently recognized and <br/> growing population of patients who have endured prolonged periods of <br/> mechanical ventilation and have a one year mortality rate of 60%. Family <br/> caregivers play a significant role in decision making for CCI individuals <br/> and are intimately involved at life's end. The purpose of this study was <br/> to describe and examine relationships between Caucasian and African <br/> American (AA) family caregivers' perceptions of satisfaction with and <br/> preparation for end of life care. This study was part of a large <br/> randomized post-discharge disease management project. Interviews were <br/> conducted with 37 caregivers of CCI patients 3-4 months after death. <br/> Sixty-two percent of the patients and caregivers were Caucasian. The <br/> majority of Caucasian caregivers were spouses and children while the <br/> majority of AA caregivers were children and parents to those who died. <br/> Both AA caregivers (mean age 50) and the patients (mean age 62) who died <br/> were younger than Caucasian caregivers (mean age 56) and patients (mean <br/> age 69). Approximately half of the patients were on mechanical ventilation <br/> at the time of death, and 57% of AA patients had CPR compared to 17% of <br/> Caucasian patients which was statistically significant. Satisfaction and <br/> preparation were pilot tested with questions from Teno&AElig;s After-Death <br/> Bereaved Family Member Interview. Chi square and t-tests were used to <br/> compare the experiences of AA and Caucasian caregivers. There were <br/> statistically significant differences between AA and Caucasian family <br/> caregivers in the area of being informed of the patient's condition and <br/> feeling confident about what to do at the time of death. There was a <br/> statistically significant positive relationship between satisfaction and <br/> preparation for AA caregivers but not for Caucasian caregivers. Health <br/> care providers should be sensitive to potential differences between <br/> Caucasian and AA family caregivers in providing end of life care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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