2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161179
Type:
Presentation
Title:
STOP-IT: Interrupting Chronic Diarrhea in HIV
Abstract:
STOP-IT: Interrupting Chronic Diarrhea in HIV
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Klebert, Michael
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-St. Louis
Title:Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Campus Box 8011, 660 South Euclid, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA
Contact Telephone:314 454-0058
Chronic noninfectious diarrhea (CND) is a common symptom of HIV infection affecting 50-60% of PWHIV/A at some point during their illness. There is evidence that CND has a major impact on health related quality of life (HRQOL) and is associated with other distressing symptoms. Untreated, CND is debilitating and demoralizing. The purpose of this two part study was to 1) investigate the effects of diarrhea-reducing treatment protocol, STOP-IT, with HIV positive individuals, and 2) examine the reliability and validity of the Stool Characteristics Log (SCR-1) with HIV and non-HIV subjects. A single-case experimental design was used with six subjects with the STOP-IT intervention, (Glutamine, Fiber and Calcium Gluconate) compared to standard therapy of Imodium. A crossover design with a 2-week period of evaluation followed by a one-week washout period. There was modest response to the experimental treatment in four subjects who completed the entire study. To further support future use of the low literacy, self-reported Stool Characteristics Log (SCR-1), it is evaluated in 35 HIV positive individuals with and 35 individuals without complaints of diarrhea in the preceding seven days. Two internal consistency estimates of reliability (coefficient-alpha and split-half coefficient expressed as a Spearman-Brown corrected correlation) were found highly satisfactory. Additionally, scores from the QOL 601-2 and HAT-HRQOL instruments affirmed diminished scores in subjects with even modest amounts of diarrhea compared to those without diarrhea and this correlated to the SCR-1. Finally, increased scores from the Signs and Symptoms Checklist for HIV (SSC-HIV) and the HIV Symptom Index (QL0730) inversely correlated to both of the HRQOL instruments and correlated with the SCR-1. This research provides a promising instrument for nurses and others in the assessment of outpatient patient reported diarrhea which to date has been entirely subjective. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSTOP-IT: Interrupting Chronic Diarrhea in HIVen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161179-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">STOP-IT: Interrupting Chronic Diarrhea in HIV</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Klebert, Michael</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-St. Louis</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Campus Box 8011, 660 South Euclid, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314 454-0058</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mklebert@im.wustl.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Chronic noninfectious diarrhea (CND) is a common symptom of HIV infection affecting 50-60% of PWHIV/A at some point during their illness. There is evidence that CND has a major impact on health related quality of life (HRQOL) and is associated with other distressing symptoms. Untreated, CND is debilitating and demoralizing. The purpose of this two part study was to 1) investigate the effects of diarrhea-reducing treatment protocol, STOP-IT, with HIV positive individuals, and 2) examine the reliability and validity of the Stool Characteristics Log (SCR-1) with HIV and non-HIV subjects. A single-case experimental design was used with six subjects with the STOP-IT intervention, (Glutamine, Fiber and Calcium Gluconate) compared to standard therapy of Imodium. A crossover design with a 2-week period of evaluation followed by a one-week washout period. There was modest response to the experimental treatment in four subjects who completed the entire study. To further support future use of the low literacy, self-reported Stool Characteristics Log (SCR-1), it is evaluated in 35 HIV positive individuals with and 35 individuals without complaints of diarrhea in the preceding seven days. Two internal consistency estimates of reliability (coefficient-alpha and split-half coefficient expressed as a Spearman-Brown corrected correlation) were found highly satisfactory. Additionally, scores from the QOL 601-2 and HAT-HRQOL instruments affirmed diminished scores in subjects with even modest amounts of diarrhea compared to those without diarrhea and this correlated to the SCR-1. Finally, increased scores from the Signs and Symptoms Checklist for HIV (SSC-HIV) and the HIV Symptom Index (QL0730) inversely correlated to both of the HRQOL instruments and correlated with the SCR-1. This research provides a promising instrument for nurses and others in the assessment of outpatient patient reported diarrhea which to date has been entirely subjective. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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