Oncology Patients' Decision-making About Their Disease Treatment: An Integrative Literature Review

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161183
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Oncology Patients' Decision-making About Their Disease Treatment: An Integrative Literature Review
Abstract:
Oncology Patients' Decision-making About Their Disease Treatment: An Integrative Literature Review
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Krassa, Teresa, PhD, MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Medical-Surgical Nursing, 408 South Goodwin Ave (MC-076), Urbana, IL, 61801, USA
Contact Telephone:(217) 333-9584
The American Cancer Society estimated about 1,334,100 cases of cancer
would be diagnosed in 2003. These individuals face the stressful task of
making decisions about their cancer treatment. Their decisions are
influenced by a wide variety of issues. It is imperative for nurses to
understand the complexity of the patients' decision-making about their
treatment to support client autonomy and coping. The purpose of this
research study was to conduct an integrative literature review of the most
recent research-based articles exploring oncology patients'
decision-making about their cancer treatment. The conceptual framework
guiding this study was a modified version of the Embedded Decisional Model
of Stress and Coping (Balneaves & Long, 1999). The design for this study
was a qualitative, integrative literature review. Searches on the CINAHL,
PubMed, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, and Social Services Abstracts
databases from the past 15 years yielded 341 articles, from which 73
research studies were identified meeting the inclusion criteria. A random
sample of 30 studies was selected from this target population. Based on
Ganong's (1987) method of conducting integrative research reviews and from
related literature, a data collection tool was developed to provide a
means to collect study data and provide categories for article analysis.
Rules for data analysis and interpretation were established to compare
study methods, results, and conclusions using descriptive analysis.
Results of the study revealed oncology patients' treatment decision-making
is influenced by personal and interpersonal factors. Personal factors
included anxiety, fear of recurrence, decision-making style/control,
coping strategies, treatment information sought and received, demographic
characteristics, and other psychological factors including body image.
Interpersonal factors included communication issues, health care provider
interactions, and social support issues. Implications of the study
findings for nursing practice include improving health care provider
interactions, assessing decisional control and psychological status, and
individualizing treatment information.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOncology Patients' Decision-making About Their Disease Treatment: An Integrative Literature Reviewen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161183-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Oncology Patients' Decision-making About Their Disease Treatment: An Integrative Literature Review</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Krassa, Teresa, PhD, MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Medical-Surgical Nursing, 408 South Goodwin Ave (MC-076), Urbana, IL, 61801, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(217) 333-9584</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tjkrassa@uiuc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The American Cancer Society estimated about 1,334,100 cases of cancer <br/> would be diagnosed in 2003. These individuals face the stressful task of <br/> making decisions about their cancer treatment. Their decisions are <br/> influenced by a wide variety of issues. It is imperative for nurses to <br/> understand the complexity of the patients' decision-making about their <br/> treatment to support client autonomy and coping. The purpose of this <br/> research study was to conduct an integrative literature review of the most <br/> recent research-based articles exploring oncology patients' <br/> decision-making about their cancer treatment. The conceptual framework <br/> guiding this study was a modified version of the Embedded Decisional Model <br/> of Stress and Coping (Balneaves &amp; Long, 1999). The design for this study <br/> was a qualitative, integrative literature review. Searches on the CINAHL, <br/> PubMed, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, and Social Services Abstracts <br/> databases from the past 15 years yielded 341 articles, from which 73 <br/> research studies were identified meeting the inclusion criteria. A random <br/> sample of 30 studies was selected from this target population. Based on <br/> Ganong's (1987) method of conducting integrative research reviews and from <br/> related literature, a data collection tool was developed to provide a <br/> means to collect study data and provide categories for article analysis. <br/> Rules for data analysis and interpretation were established to compare <br/> study methods, results, and conclusions using descriptive analysis. <br/> Results of the study revealed oncology patients' treatment decision-making <br/> is influenced by personal and interpersonal factors. Personal factors <br/> included anxiety, fear of recurrence, decision-making style/control, <br/> coping strategies, treatment information sought and received, demographic <br/> characteristics, and other psychological factors including body image. <br/> Interpersonal factors included communication issues, health care provider <br/> interactions, and social support issues. Implications of the study <br/> findings for nursing practice include improving health care provider <br/> interactions, assessing decisional control and psychological status, and <br/> individualizing treatment information.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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