Cognitive Representations of Illness of Thai Women Newly Diagnosed with Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161184
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive Representations of Illness of Thai Women Newly Diagnosed with Breast Cancer
Abstract:
Cognitive Representations of Illness of Thai Women Newly Diagnosed with Breast Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kritpracha, Charuwan, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Prince of Songkla University
Title:Lecturer
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Hat-Yai, Songkla, 90112, Thailand
Contact Telephone:66-74-211030
Co-Authors:Bernadine Cimprich, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Laurel L Northouse, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Nancy Janz, PhD, Associate Professor, Margaret Scisney-Matlock, PhD, Associate Professor
This study is the first to examine cognitive representations of
illness in Thai women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. The specific aim
of the study was to examine the structure and content of cognitive
representations of illness of Thai women with breast cancer. According to
Leventhal's self-regulatory model, an individual's responses to illness
are based upon cognitive representations of illness consisting of five
components: identity, causes, time-line, consequences, and
cure/controllability. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted
with 45 Thai women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Participants were
assessed after primary surgery and before chemotherapy or radiotherapy.
Study instruments included the Conceptual Content Cognitive Map (3CM)
Method, an open-ended interview technique designed to assess an
individual's cognitive representations and the established Illness
Perception Questionnaire (IPQ). Data from the 3CM and the IPQ were
analyzed using content analysis and descriptive statistics, respectively.
Findings from the 3CM partially supported the theoretical structure of
cognitive representation of illness. Participants made no statements
related to the illness time-line. Three additional categories: emotion,
coping, and social support emerged. Patients freely expressed thoughts
about: coping strategies such as modifying diet and employing Buddha's
doctrine; negative consequences; attributions to causes such as diet,
Karma; perceptions of less cure/controllability; emotions such as fear,
and support from family and friends. Findings from the IPQ revealed that
patients perceived moderate frequency of symptoms associated with the
illness; moderately chronic time-line; negative consequences; more
cure/controllability; and various causes of the illness. The findings from
the 3CM method and the IPQ provided similarities and differences. The 3CM
method particularly provided an enriched understanding of cognitive
representations of breast cancer in Thai women, who have a uniquely
different culture from women in Western countries. Such information can be
used to help nurses provide tailored and effective interventions
specifically for Thai women with breast cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive Representations of Illness of Thai Women Newly Diagnosed with Breast Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161184-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cognitive Representations of Illness of Thai Women Newly Diagnosed with Breast Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kritpracha, Charuwan, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Prince of Songkla University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Hat-Yai, Songkla, 90112, Thailand</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">66-74-211030</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ckritpra@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bernadine Cimprich, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Laurel L Northouse, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Nancy Janz, PhD, Associate Professor, Margaret Scisney-Matlock, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study is the first to examine cognitive representations of <br/> illness in Thai women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. The specific aim <br/> of the study was to examine the structure and content of cognitive <br/> representations of illness of Thai women with breast cancer. According to <br/> Leventhal's self-regulatory model, an individual's responses to illness <br/> are based upon cognitive representations of illness consisting of five <br/> components: identity, causes, time-line, consequences, and <br/> cure/controllability. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted <br/> with 45 Thai women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Participants were <br/> assessed after primary surgery and before chemotherapy or radiotherapy. <br/> Study instruments included the Conceptual Content Cognitive Map (3CM) <br/> Method, an open-ended interview technique designed to assess an <br/> individual's cognitive representations and the established Illness <br/> Perception Questionnaire (IPQ). Data from the 3CM and the IPQ were <br/> analyzed using content analysis and descriptive statistics, respectively. <br/> Findings from the 3CM partially supported the theoretical structure of <br/> cognitive representation of illness. Participants made no statements <br/> related to the illness time-line. Three additional categories: emotion, <br/> coping, and social support emerged. Patients freely expressed thoughts <br/> about: coping strategies such as modifying diet and employing Buddha's <br/> doctrine; negative consequences; attributions to causes such as diet, <br/> Karma; perceptions of less cure/controllability; emotions such as fear, <br/> and support from family and friends. Findings from the IPQ revealed that <br/> patients perceived moderate frequency of symptoms associated with the <br/> illness; moderately chronic time-line; negative consequences; more <br/> cure/controllability; and various causes of the illness. The findings from <br/> the 3CM method and the IPQ provided similarities and differences. The 3CM <br/> method particularly provided an enriched understanding of cognitive <br/> representations of breast cancer in Thai women, who have a uniquely <br/> different culture from women in Western countries. Such information can be <br/> used to help nurses provide tailored and effective interventions <br/> specifically for Thai women with breast cancer.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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