2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161188
Type:
Presentation
Title:
FatherÆs Emotional Response to Subsequent Pregnancy After Perinatal Loss
Abstract:
FatherÆs Emotional Response to Subsequent Pregnancy After Perinatal Loss
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lewis, Alicia, Co-Presenter and Study Contact
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville
Title:Research Assistant
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, K 3048 School of Nursing Health Sciences, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA
Contact Telephone:502-852-8095
Co-Authors:Lindsey Manning, Research Assistant - Co-Presenter; Deborah Armstrong, Assistant Professor; Marianne Hutti, Professor; and Craig Ziegler, Research Analyst
Purpose: Examine father's emotional response during a subsequent pregnancy after previous perinatal loss as well as after the birth of a healthy baby in comparison to fathers in their first pregnancy. Design: Two group pretest/post-test comparative design. Participants: Twelve expectant fathers with a history of perinatal loss, and 11 expectant fathers in their first pregnancy. Method: Structured questionnaires administered via phone interviews. Questionnaires: The following were used to measure: Depressive symptoms (CES-D; Radloff, 1977); Current distress related to a specific event (IES; Harowitz, 1997); Pregnancy-specific anxiety (POQ; Theut et al., 1988); Generalized anxiety (STAI; Spielberger et al., 1984); Quality of primary intimate relationships (ARI; Schaufer & Edgerton, 1982; Hall & Kiernan, 1992). Findings: The study is on-going with results expected in the Spring 2005. Clinical Implications: Pregnancies following perinatal loss can be powerful stressors for expectant fathers. They frequently feel apprehension about the outcome of a subsequent pregnancy that may lead to significant and prolonged levels of depressive symptoms and anxiety. It is unclear the duration of psychological distress after the birth of a healthy infant, or other long-term consequences of a history of perinatal loss on father's developing attitudes toward themselves as parents and their concerns about the well-being of their new infant.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFatherÆs Emotional Response to Subsequent Pregnancy After Perinatal Lossen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161188-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Father&AElig;s Emotional Response to Subsequent Pregnancy After Perinatal Loss</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lewis, Alicia, Co-Presenter and Study Contact</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, K 3048 School of Nursing Health Sciences, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">502-852-8095</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">a0lewi01@louisville.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lindsey Manning, Research Assistant - Co-Presenter; Deborah Armstrong, Assistant Professor; Marianne Hutti, Professor; and Craig Ziegler, Research Analyst</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Examine father's emotional response during a subsequent pregnancy after previous perinatal loss as well as after the birth of a healthy baby in comparison to fathers in their first pregnancy. Design: Two group pretest/post-test comparative design. Participants: Twelve expectant fathers with a history of perinatal loss, and 11 expectant fathers in their first pregnancy. Method: Structured questionnaires administered via phone interviews. Questionnaires: The following were used to measure: Depressive symptoms (CES-D; Radloff, 1977); Current distress related to a specific event (IES; Harowitz, 1997); Pregnancy-specific anxiety (POQ; Theut et al., 1988); Generalized anxiety (STAI; Spielberger et al., 1984); Quality of primary intimate relationships (ARI; Schaufer &amp; Edgerton, 1982; Hall &amp; Kiernan, 1992). Findings: The study is on-going with results expected in the Spring 2005. Clinical Implications: Pregnancies following perinatal loss can be powerful stressors for expectant fathers. They frequently feel apprehension about the outcome of a subsequent pregnancy that may lead to significant and prolonged levels of depressive symptoms and anxiety. It is unclear the duration of psychological distress after the birth of a healthy infant, or other long-term consequences of a history of perinatal loss on father's developing attitudes toward themselves as parents and their concerns about the well-being of their new infant.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.