Social Capital, Health, and Nursing: Recent Advances in Conceptualization in the Literature

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161191
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Capital, Health, and Nursing: Recent Advances in Conceptualization in the Literature
Abstract:
Social Capital, Health, and Nursing: Recent Advances in Conceptualization in the Literature
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Looman, Wendy, PhD, MS, CPNP, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 5-160 WDH, 308 Harvard SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-624-6604
Co-Authors:Gita Rijal, MSN, BSN, BA, RN, Graduate Research Assistant
Background. A relationship between social capital and health has been
documented, however the evidence has been limited by a lack of consistency
in the definition and measurement of social capital as a health-related
construct. A review of literature between 1990 and 2002 (Carlson &
Chamberlain, 2003) identified three main deficits related to social
capital in research: lack of distinction of the concept as a geographic or
individual attribute; inconsistencies in conceptual and operational
definitions; and limited theoretical exploration of causal linkages.
Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the theoretical and
empirical evidence relating social capital and health since Carlson &
Chamberlain's review. The aim was to provide a basis for research in
nursing that incorporates the concept of social capital and takes into
consideration the recent conceptual work that has occurred related to this
concept. Method. A literature search of PubMed and CINHAL databases from
2002 to 2004 was performed using the search terms "social capital",
"health" and "nursing". Criteria for inclusion in this study were a clear
definition of social capital and a primary focus on the relationship
between health and social capital. 167 articles were retrieved; 36 met
inclusion criteria for the study. Results. A majority of articles refer to
social capital as a geographical attribute and suggest theoretical bases
for the relationship between health and social capital. The distinction
between social support and social capital is recognized as an area in need
of clarification. Conclusion. The attention to clarifying social capital's
theoretical and empirical linkages to health has led to greater
consistency in definition and measurement of social concept. Nursing
research will benefit from this concept's recent maturity as a
health-related concept. Recommendations include developing and testing
measures of social capital that are specific to health promotion.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Capital, Health, and Nursing: Recent Advances in Conceptualization in the Literatureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161191-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Social Capital, Health, and Nursing: Recent Advances in Conceptualization in the Literature</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Looman, Wendy, PhD, MS, CPNP, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 5-160 WDH, 308 Harvard SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-624-6604</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">looma003@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gita Rijal, MSN, BSN, BA, RN, Graduate Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background. A relationship between social capital and health has been <br/> documented, however the evidence has been limited by a lack of consistency <br/> in the definition and measurement of social capital as a health-related <br/> construct. A review of literature between 1990 and 2002 (Carlson &amp; <br/> Chamberlain, 2003) identified three main deficits related to social <br/> capital in research: lack of distinction of the concept as a geographic or <br/> individual attribute; inconsistencies in conceptual and operational <br/> definitions; and limited theoretical exploration of causal linkages. <br/> Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the theoretical and <br/> empirical evidence relating social capital and health since Carlson &amp; <br/> Chamberlain's review. The aim was to provide a basis for research in <br/> nursing that incorporates the concept of social capital and takes into <br/> consideration the recent conceptual work that has occurred related to this <br/> concept. Method. A literature search of PubMed and CINHAL databases from <br/> 2002 to 2004 was performed using the search terms &quot;social capital&quot;, <br/> &quot;health&quot; and &quot;nursing&quot;. Criteria for inclusion in this study were a clear <br/> definition of social capital and a primary focus on the relationship <br/> between health and social capital. 167 articles were retrieved; 36 met <br/> inclusion criteria for the study. Results. A majority of articles refer to <br/> social capital as a geographical attribute and suggest theoretical bases <br/> for the relationship between health and social capital. The distinction <br/> between social support and social capital is recognized as an area in need <br/> of clarification. Conclusion. The attention to clarifying social capital's <br/> theoretical and empirical linkages to health has led to greater <br/> consistency in definition and measurement of social concept. Nursing <br/> research will benefit from this concept's recent maturity as a <br/> health-related concept. Recommendations include developing and testing <br/> measures of social capital that are specific to health promotion.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.