2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161193
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Care and Cost Outcomes for Home Health Care Patients with Wounds
Abstract:
Care and Cost Outcomes for Home Health Care Patients with Wounds
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Madigan, Elizabeth, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-8532
Patients with wound and skin lesions represent a high volume and high
cost patient population. In the current provider system, home health care
agencies need to balance effective care with prudent resource use. Despite
evidence based practice recommendations that the appropriate approach to
wound care is through moist healing practices, anecdotal information
suggests that wet-to-dry dressings continue to be used. The purpose of the
study was to determine the prevalence of wet-to-dry dressings among a home
health care patient population and evaluate the patient outcomes between
wet-to-dry and moist wound healing approaches. Data were obtained from 5
home health care agencies in northeastern Ohio that provided clinical
information on patient status, wound healing approaches, and numbers of
visits. Patients (N=515) were on average 67.3 years old, 57.1% female and
20.5% minority ethnicity. Of those requiring dressings (57%), patients
with surgical wounds (N=185) were the most common, followed by 63 subjects
with pressure ulcers and 29 subjects with stasis ulcers. Use of wet-to-dry
dressings occurred in 28%, 18% and 43% of patients, respectively. There
were no significant differences in healing status when comparing the three
groups on wet-to-dry versus moist wound healing approaches. There were
significant differences in the numbers of home visits required for
patients with stasis ulcers wherein the patients receiving wet-to-dry
dressings required substantially more visits (43.4 versus 18.1, t=2.37,
p=.03). Despite years of evidence to the contrary, wet-to-dry dressings
continue to be used. Although there were no differences in healing status,
the measure of healing was gross and more refined measures are needed. A
second finding of note was the number of home health care patients with
identified wounds who did not require any kind of dressing suggesting that
gross measures may over-estimate the numbers of patients with wounds.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCare and Cost Outcomes for Home Health Care Patients with Woundsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161193-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Care and Cost Outcomes for Home Health Care Patients with Wounds</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Madigan, Elizabeth, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-8532</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">madigan@case.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Patients with wound and skin lesions represent a high volume and high <br/> cost patient population. In the current provider system, home health care <br/> agencies need to balance effective care with prudent resource use. Despite <br/> evidence based practice recommendations that the appropriate approach to <br/> wound care is through moist healing practices, anecdotal information <br/> suggests that wet-to-dry dressings continue to be used. The purpose of the <br/> study was to determine the prevalence of wet-to-dry dressings among a home <br/> health care patient population and evaluate the patient outcomes between <br/> wet-to-dry and moist wound healing approaches. Data were obtained from 5 <br/> home health care agencies in northeastern Ohio that provided clinical <br/> information on patient status, wound healing approaches, and numbers of <br/> visits. Patients (N=515) were on average 67.3 years old, 57.1% female and <br/> 20.5% minority ethnicity. Of those requiring dressings (57%), patients <br/> with surgical wounds (N=185) were the most common, followed by 63 subjects <br/> with pressure ulcers and 29 subjects with stasis ulcers. Use of wet-to-dry <br/> dressings occurred in 28%, 18% and 43% of patients, respectively. There <br/> were no significant differences in healing status when comparing the three <br/> groups on wet-to-dry versus moist wound healing approaches. There were <br/> significant differences in the numbers of home visits required for <br/> patients with stasis ulcers wherein the patients receiving wet-to-dry <br/> dressings required substantially more visits (43.4 versus 18.1, t=2.37, <br/> p=.03). Despite years of evidence to the contrary, wet-to-dry dressings <br/> continue to be used. Although there were no differences in healing status, <br/> the measure of healing was gross and more refined measures are needed. A <br/> second finding of note was the number of home health care patients with <br/> identified wounds who did not require any kind of dressing suggesting that <br/> gross measures may over-estimate the numbers of patients with wounds.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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