2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161198
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Colon Cancer Screening Beliefs by Stage of Behavior Adoption
Abstract:
Colon Cancer Screening Beliefs by Stage of Behavior Adoption
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Menon, Usha, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Medical-Surgical Nursing, 845 S. Damen Ave, MC 802, Room 718, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-413-4326
Co-Authors:B. Erin Witter, PhDc, Research Analyst; Victoria Champion, DNS, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean for Research; and Celette S. Skinner, PhD, Associate Professor
Colorectal cancer remains the third leading cause of cancer death in
the United States despite increased attention to early detection and
prevention behaviors. Interventions to increase screening for cancer often
focus on impacting behavior change by altering beliefs and knowledge. The
primary aim of this study is to test the effectiveness of tailored and
non-tailored interventions designed to increase the use of FOBT and
sigmoidoscopy among non-adherent men and women aged 50 years or older.
According to the Transtheoretical Model, behavior change occurs, not as a
dichotomous event, but as a series of incremental stages. Effective
interventions must focus on altering beliefs at each stage to impact
behavior change. The Health Belief Model provides guidance for tailoring
education at each of the stages for behavior change. In this prospective,
randomized intervention study participants (N=206) were randomly assigned
to one of 3 groups: 1) usual care, 2) tailored print communication, and 3)
non-tailored print communication. Data were collected via telephone at
baseline and 2 months post-intervention. The sample was primarily
Caucasian, female, middle class, reported at least a high school
education, with a mean age of 60. Several beliefs differed by stage of
behavior adoption post-intervention. For stool blood test, there were
significant differences in barriers (F=9.48, p< .001), benefits (F=3.17, p
<.01), and self-efficacy (F=2.39, p<.05). Precontemplators had
significantly lower benefits and self-efficacy, and higher barriers than
those in action. For sigmoidoscopy, barriers (F=9.05, p< .001) and
self-efficacy (F=2.58, p<.05) were significantly different by stage;
precontemplators had significantly higher barriers and lower self-efficacy
than contemplators and actors. Results indicate that individuals differ
significantly in beliefs according to their stage of screening adoption.
This could guide future research to develop interventions tailored to
individual beliefs and stage of behavior adoption.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleColon Cancer Screening Beliefs by Stage of Behavior Adoptionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161198-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Colon Cancer Screening Beliefs by Stage of Behavior Adoption</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Menon, Usha, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Medical-Surgical Nursing, 845 S. Damen Ave, MC 802, Room 718, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-413-4326</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">umenon@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B. Erin Witter, PhDc, Research Analyst; Victoria Champion, DNS, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean for Research; and Celette S. Skinner, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Colorectal cancer remains the third leading cause of cancer death in <br/> the United States despite increased attention to early detection and <br/> prevention behaviors. Interventions to increase screening for cancer often <br/> focus on impacting behavior change by altering beliefs and knowledge. The <br/> primary aim of this study is to test the effectiveness of tailored and <br/> non-tailored interventions designed to increase the use of FOBT and <br/> sigmoidoscopy among non-adherent men and women aged 50 years or older. <br/> According to the Transtheoretical Model, behavior change occurs, not as a <br/> dichotomous event, but as a series of incremental stages. Effective <br/> interventions must focus on altering beliefs at each stage to impact <br/> behavior change. The Health Belief Model provides guidance for tailoring <br/> education at each of the stages for behavior change. In this prospective, <br/> randomized intervention study participants (N=206) were randomly assigned <br/> to one of 3 groups: 1) usual care, 2) tailored print communication, and 3) <br/> non-tailored print communication. Data were collected via telephone at <br/> baseline and 2 months post-intervention. The sample was primarily <br/> Caucasian, female, middle class, reported at least a high school <br/> education, with a mean age of 60. Several beliefs differed by stage of <br/> behavior adoption post-intervention. For stool blood test, there were <br/> significant differences in barriers (F=9.48, p&lt; .001), benefits (F=3.17, p <br/> &lt;.01), and self-efficacy (F=2.39, p&lt;.05). Precontemplators had <br/> significantly lower benefits and self-efficacy, and higher barriers than <br/> those in action. For sigmoidoscopy, barriers (F=9.05, p&lt; .001) and <br/> self-efficacy (F=2.58, p&lt;.05) were significantly different by stage; <br/> precontemplators had significantly higher barriers and lower self-efficacy <br/> than contemplators and actors. Results indicate that individuals differ <br/> significantly in beliefs according to their stage of screening adoption. <br/> This could guide future research to develop interventions tailored to <br/> individual beliefs and stage of behavior adoption.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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