2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161199
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Colon Cancer beliefs among Hispanics and Caucasians
Abstract:
Colon Cancer beliefs among Hispanics and Caucasians
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Menon, Usha, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 S. Damen Ave, MC 802, Room 718, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-413-4326
Co-Authors:Peter Maramaldi, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor; and Stephanie Wahab, PhD, Assistant Professor
x
Bridging cancer screening disparities, between privileged groups and
underserved populations, is an important national research priority and
constitutes a larger social justice issue. This study is part of a broader
and ongoing research program aimed at increasing participation in
colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among Latino subgroups. Despite low
screening rates in Hispanic populations, population specific interventions
to increase CRC screening are relatively underdeveloped. Purpose: Focus
groups were conducted to better understand the range of beliefs and
knowledge regarding CRC screening among Hispanic and Caucasian
populations. Theoretical Framework and Methods: Using the Health Belief
Model to frame the interview guide, focus groups were conducted to elicit
beliefs in perceived susceptibility, benefits, barriers, and patient
provider communication issues. Hispanic (3) and Caucasian (2) focus groups
were recruited from the local community. Spanish and English speaking
moderators facilitated the audio recorded group discussions, assisted with
content analysis of transcripts, and worked with the research team to
identify cultural and linguistic nuances relevant to the translation of
the interview guide and the transcripts. Results: Primary barriers to
screening among Hispanic women were embarrassment, communication problems
with doctors, and fear. Caucasian women reported embarrassment, painful
experiences, cost, and no symptoms. Hispanic men thought CRC screening was
covered under a physical, felt 'invaded', joked about the screening
procedure's impact on 'machismo' and were generally fatalistic about
cancer. Caucasian men preferred not to find out about a long term illness,
had other health problems which took precedence, and disliked the
preparation. There was consensus among all the groups that communication
with providers was a major deterrent when doctors did not listen, explain
tests well, or recommend screening. Conclusions: Despite subtle cultural
differences similarities in CRC screening beliefs warrant the adaptation
of our existing tailored intervention for Hispanics--provided adjustments
are made for cultural and linguistic relevance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleColon Cancer beliefs among Hispanics and Caucasiansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161199-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Colon Cancer beliefs among Hispanics and Caucasians</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Menon, Usha, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 S. Damen Ave, MC 802, Room 718, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-413-4326</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">umenon@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Peter Maramaldi, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor; and Stephanie Wahab, PhD, Assistant Professor<br/>x</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Bridging cancer screening disparities, between privileged groups and <br/> underserved populations, is an important national research priority and <br/> constitutes a larger social justice issue. This study is part of a broader <br/> and ongoing research program aimed at increasing participation in <br/> colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among Latino subgroups. Despite low <br/> screening rates in Hispanic populations, population specific interventions <br/> to increase CRC screening are relatively underdeveloped. Purpose: Focus <br/> groups were conducted to better understand the range of beliefs and <br/> knowledge regarding CRC screening among Hispanic and Caucasian <br/> populations. Theoretical Framework and Methods: Using the Health Belief <br/> Model to frame the interview guide, focus groups were conducted to elicit <br/> beliefs in perceived susceptibility, benefits, barriers, and patient <br/> provider communication issues. Hispanic (3) and Caucasian (2) focus groups <br/> were recruited from the local community. Spanish and English speaking <br/> moderators facilitated the audio recorded group discussions, assisted with <br/> content analysis of transcripts, and worked with the research team to <br/> identify cultural and linguistic nuances relevant to the translation of <br/> the interview guide and the transcripts. Results: Primary barriers to <br/> screening among Hispanic women were embarrassment, communication problems <br/> with doctors, and fear. Caucasian women reported embarrassment, painful <br/> experiences, cost, and no symptoms. Hispanic men thought CRC screening was <br/> covered under a physical, felt 'invaded', joked about the screening <br/> procedure's impact on 'machismo' and were generally fatalistic about <br/> cancer. Caucasian men preferred not to find out about a long term illness, <br/> had other health problems which took precedence, and disliked the <br/> preparation. There was consensus among all the groups that communication <br/> with providers was a major deterrent when doctors did not listen, explain <br/> tests well, or recommend screening. Conclusions: Despite subtle cultural <br/> differences similarities in CRC screening beliefs warrant the adaptation <br/> of our existing tailored intervention for Hispanics--provided adjustments <br/> are made for cultural and linguistic relevance.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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