2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161202
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Postpartum Depression: Is telephone screening a reliable option?
Abstract:
Postpartum Depression: Is telephone screening a reliable option?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Mitchell, Anne, PhD, CNM, MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Oakland University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 418 O'Dowd, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA
Contact Telephone:(248) 370-4098
Co-Authors:Darlene Schott-Baer, PhD, MSN, BSN and Mary E. Mittelstaedt, PhD, MSN, BSN, Associate Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the screening of
women for postpartum depression by a telephone assessment after hospital
discharge. Subjects & Methods: Two standardized screening instruments, the Edinburgh
Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Postpartum Depression Screening
Scale (PDSS), were used to screen for PPD during a series of follow up
phone calls. A convenience sample of mothers (N=117; Gravida 1-9)ranging
in age from 17-43 were recruited from a midwestern community hospital.
Background information including; client history, family history, and birth
experience data was obtained before discharge. The EPDS was administered
at two weeks postpartum, and the PDSS was administered between six and
eight weeks. Results: The total scores for the EPDS and both the short and long form of
the PDSS correlated significantly, (r=.691, p,.01), and (r=.646, p,<.01).
The correlations between the short form of the PDSS and the sub-scales
scores are notably higher than the correlations with the EPDS tool. At two
weeks, 12% of the women had positive screening scores indicating moderate
to sever depression, and received a referral for follow-up care. The
number of women with a positive screen increased to 24% by eight weeks,
with 9% of those women having scores high enough to suggest the presence
of severe depression. Conclusion: A critical period for screening for PPD is 2-8 weeks after
hospital discharge. Use of a telephone assessment by nurses is a key
factor in identifying women with PPD. The use of the seven-item short form
of the PDSS is easily implemented offering an efficient method for
evaluating the existence of PPD. A positive screen with the short form can
be further evaluated immediately with the full 35-item scale, leading to
the appropriate and critical referral.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePostpartum Depression: Is telephone screening a reliable option?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161202-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Postpartum Depression: Is telephone screening a reliable option?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mitchell, Anne, PhD, CNM, MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oakland University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 418 O'Dowd, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(248) 370-4098</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">amgcnm@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Darlene Schott-Baer, PhD, MSN, BSN and Mary E. Mittelstaedt, PhD, MSN, BSN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the screening of <br/> women for postpartum depression by a telephone assessment after hospital <br/> discharge. Subjects &amp; Methods: Two standardized screening instruments, the Edinburgh <br/> Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Postpartum Depression Screening <br/> Scale (PDSS), were used to screen for PPD during a series of follow up <br/> phone calls. A convenience sample of mothers (N=117; Gravida 1-9)ranging <br/> in age from 17-43 were recruited from a midwestern community hospital. <br/> Background information including; client history, family history, and birth <br/> experience data was obtained before discharge. The EPDS was administered <br/> at two weeks postpartum, and the PDSS was administered between six and <br/> eight weeks. Results: The total scores for the EPDS and both the short and long form of <br/> the PDSS correlated significantly, (r=.691, p,.01), and (r=.646, p,&lt;.01). <br/> The correlations between the short form of the PDSS and the sub-scales <br/> scores are notably higher than the correlations with the EPDS tool. At two <br/> weeks, 12% of the women had positive screening scores indicating moderate <br/> to sever depression, and received a referral for follow-up care. The <br/> number of women with a positive screen increased to 24% by eight weeks, <br/> with 9% of those women having scores high enough to suggest the presence <br/> of severe depression. Conclusion: A critical period for screening for PPD is 2-8 weeks after <br/> hospital discharge. Use of a telephone assessment by nurses is a key <br/> factor in identifying women with PPD. The use of the seven-item short form <br/> of the PDSS is easily implemented offering an efficient method for <br/> evaluating the existence of PPD. A positive screen with the short form can <br/> be further evaluated immediately with the full 35-item scale, leading to <br/> the appropriate and critical referral.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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