Effect of High-Quality, Daily Physical Education on Body Mass Index in School-Aged Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161203
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of High-Quality, Daily Physical Education on Body Mass Index in School-Aged Children
Abstract:
Effect of High-Quality, Daily Physical Education on Body Mass Index in School-Aged Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Moberley, Jorie
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 475 Scarborough Road, Valparaiso, IN, 46385, USA
Contact Telephone:(219)477-1737
The purpose of this descriptive, comparative survey design was to investigate if there is a difference in body mass index (BMI) among school-aged children who participate in daily, high-quality physical education and those who do not. The dramatic increase in childhood obesity is particularly evident among school-aged children for whom mandatory physical education in schools is becoming rare. The Prevention Decision Tree, a new, untested framework for prevention, guided this study because obesity often persists into adulthood, is resistant to treatment, and has serious health consequences. Schools are a potentially important channel for preventive interventions because the adoption of significant lifestyle behaviors occurs primarily during childhood and adolescence. Sixty-five students from three suburban schools in Northeast Illinois and Northwest Indiana participated in the study. Twenty-three participated in daily, high-quality physical education, 24 had high-quality physical education two days per week, and 18 had sub-standard physical education one day a week. In this study, high-quality physical education was based on standards set forth by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE). Height and weight measurements were used to calculate the BMIs of students from each type of program and determinations of overweight or obesity were made based on Centers for Disease Control body mass index tables. The results indicated a statistically significant difference in BMI between the schools that offered high-quality physical education and the school that offered sub-standard physical education. However, physical education was not associated with BMI; suggesting that nine other significant variables accounted for the difference (race, income, parental education, maternal BMI, daily caloric intake, daily caloric expenditure, total fat, saturated fat, and carbohydrate intake). Identifying factors that contribute to the development of obesity makes it possible to develop and implement preventive interventions. The results of this study further demonstrate that obesity prevention requires a multi-faceted approach delivered through a variety of settings. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of High-Quality, Daily Physical Education on Body Mass Index in School-Aged Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161203-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of High-Quality, Daily Physical Education on Body Mass Index in School-Aged Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moberley, Jorie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 475 Scarborough Road, Valparaiso, IN, 46385, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(219)477-1737</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joriemoberley@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this descriptive, comparative survey design was to investigate if there is a difference in body mass index (BMI) among school-aged children who participate in daily, high-quality physical education and those who do not. The dramatic increase in childhood obesity is particularly evident among school-aged children for whom mandatory physical education in schools is becoming rare. The Prevention Decision Tree, a new, untested framework for prevention, guided this study because obesity often persists into adulthood, is resistant to treatment, and has serious health consequences. Schools are a potentially important channel for preventive interventions because the adoption of significant lifestyle behaviors occurs primarily during childhood and adolescence. Sixty-five students from three suburban schools in Northeast Illinois and Northwest Indiana participated in the study. Twenty-three participated in daily, high-quality physical education, 24 had high-quality physical education two days per week, and 18 had sub-standard physical education one day a week. In this study, high-quality physical education was based on standards set forth by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE). Height and weight measurements were used to calculate the BMIs of students from each type of program and determinations of overweight or obesity were made based on Centers for Disease Control body mass index tables. The results indicated a statistically significant difference in BMI between the schools that offered high-quality physical education and the school that offered sub-standard physical education. However, physical education was not associated with BMI; suggesting that nine other significant variables accounted for the difference (race, income, parental education, maternal BMI, daily caloric intake, daily caloric expenditure, total fat, saturated fat, and carbohydrate intake). Identifying factors that contribute to the development of obesity makes it possible to develop and implement preventive interventions. The results of this study further demonstrate that obesity prevention requires a multi-faceted approach delivered through a variety of settings. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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