2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161207
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Validation of the "Distraction Coaching Intensity" Scale
Abstract:
Validation of the "Distraction Coaching Intensity" Scale
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Myers, Latisha, Study Contact
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 100 Rienow Hall #216B, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:(515) 450-4319
Co-Authors:Ann Marie McCarthy, Principal Investigator; Charmaine Kleiber; and Kirsten Hanrahan, Project Director
PROBLEM: Distraction is a useful intervention for children having painful medical procedures. While parents can be trained as distraction coaches, the frequency and quality of distraction coaching varies. A measure of the intensity of distraction coaching is needed to evaluate the integrity of training parents and effectiveness of the intervention. The purpose of this poster is to determine if the Distraction Coaching Intensity (DCI) scale can differentiate novice and expert distraction coaches, which will provide evidence of the instruments construct validity.
CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: The DCI scale is a product of the frequency (f) and the quality (q) of distraction coaching. Frequency of distraction coaching is any verbalization or action directed toward the child that is meant to focus the childÆs attention away from the medical procedure. Five quality indicators on a four-point scale define quality of distraction coaching. Frequency and quality of distraction coaching varies between trained professionals and untrained parents. METHODOLOGY: Design: Two-group comparison design Subjects: Expert distraction coaches (Child Life Specialists) and novice distraction coaches (untrained parents) providing distraction during IV insertion in children 4-10 years of age. Instrument: DCI scale, a behavior observation instrument, measures frequency, quality and intensity (f x q) of distraction. Procedures: Two coders, blinded to the groups, will score 40 (20 per group) videotapes of distraction coaching using the DCI scale. RESULTS: Scores on frequency, quality, and intensity of distraction will be calculated for each tape. The mean scores in each area (frequency, quality, intensity) for both groups (expert and novice) will be calculated, and the two groups compared using a t test. This analysis will allow us to see if the DCI is able to discriminate between novice and expert distraction coaching IMPLICATIONS: Validation of the DCI scale allows researchers and educators to evaluate the frequency, quality and intensity of distraction coaching.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleValidation of the "Distraction Coaching Intensity" Scaleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161207-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Validation of the &quot;Distraction Coaching Intensity&quot; Scale</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Myers, Latisha, Study Contact</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 100 Rienow Hall #216B, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(515) 450-4319</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">latisha-myers@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ann Marie McCarthy, Principal Investigator; Charmaine Kleiber; and Kirsten Hanrahan, Project Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PROBLEM: Distraction is a useful intervention for children having painful medical procedures. While parents can be trained as distraction coaches, the frequency and quality of distraction coaching varies. A measure of the intensity of distraction coaching is needed to evaluate the integrity of training parents and effectiveness of the intervention. The purpose of this poster is to determine if the Distraction Coaching Intensity (DCI) scale can differentiate novice and expert distraction coaches, which will provide evidence of the instruments construct validity. <br/>CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: The DCI scale is a product of the frequency (f) and the quality (q) of distraction coaching. Frequency of distraction coaching is any verbalization or action directed toward the child that is meant to focus the child&AElig;s attention away from the medical procedure. Five quality indicators on a four-point scale define quality of distraction coaching. Frequency and quality of distraction coaching varies between trained professionals and untrained parents. METHODOLOGY: Design: Two-group comparison design Subjects: Expert distraction coaches (Child Life Specialists) and novice distraction coaches (untrained parents) providing distraction during IV insertion in children 4-10 years of age. Instrument: DCI scale, a behavior observation instrument, measures frequency, quality and intensity (f x q) of distraction. Procedures: Two coders, blinded to the groups, will score 40 (20 per group) videotapes of distraction coaching using the DCI scale. RESULTS: Scores on frequency, quality, and intensity of distraction will be calculated for each tape. The mean scores in each area (frequency, quality, intensity) for both groups (expert and novice) will be calculated, and the two groups compared using a t test. This analysis will allow us to see if the DCI is able to discriminate between novice and expert distraction coaching IMPLICATIONS: Validation of the DCI scale allows researchers and educators to evaluate the frequency, quality and intensity of distraction coaching.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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