Father's Involvement in Child Health Treatment Behavior in Nigeria: Implications for Child Health Care Delivery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161208
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Father's Involvement in Child Health Treatment Behavior in Nigeria: Implications for Child Health Care Delivery
Abstract:
Father's Involvement in Child Health Treatment Behavior in Nigeria: Implications for Child Health Care Delivery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Olaogun, Adenike, MScN, BNS, RN, RM
P.I. Institution Name:Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria
Title:Principal Investigator
Contact Address:Nursing Department, Plot 9A, Adeleke Close, Rd 7, Ile -Ife, Nigeria
Contact Telephone:011-234-8033177428
Co-Authors:Adejoke Ayoola, MScN, BNS, RN, RM, Predoctoral Student; Femi Adebayo, BS, Research Analyst; Christian Okemgbo, MSc, BS; Perpertua Obianjunwa, PhD; and Emmanuel Oluyemi, PhD, MSc, BS, Lecturer
Fathers are an under-used resource for the improvement of child
health, in most of the developing countries. To implement and sustain the
child survival program in the developing world, there is a need to assess
the roles of fathers in child health care. The Health belief model is the
framework for the study. The father's health treatment behavior will
depend on his ability to detect illness symptoms in his under-five year
old child, give the symptoms a label or name, seek for alternative choices
in resolving the symptoms, take decisions to resolve the problem and
evaluate his actions. A cross sectional study was conducted in two
communities and a total of 550 pairs of fathers and mothers (330 pairs in
urban area and 220 pairs from rural area) who had a sick child within the
last 4 weeks were interviewed using a pre-piloted questionnaire. Fathers
and mothers agreed that mothers were the first to discover that child was
sick. Majority, 91% of the fathers and 97.6% of mothers indicated they
were personally involved in taking decisions and caring for their sick
children. Only 7.7 % of fathers and 5.5% of mothers indicated joint
decisions were made in the care of their child. Most respondents had low
level of knowledge on the symptoms of diseases highlighted by the study.
Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that on the first
action taken in the care of child, (p=0.01) fathers are 7 times less
likely to be personally involved in child treatment than mothers. Urban
dwellers were more likely to take an action than rural dwellers. These
findings buttress the urgent need for an educational program that will
improve the knowledge of fathers about childhood illnesses. This will
improve their identification of illness, participation in supporting both
care and biomedical facility utilization in the care of their sick
children. This will reduce the under -five morbidity and mortality.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFather's Involvement in Child Health Treatment Behavior in Nigeria: Implications for Child Health Care Deliveryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161208-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Father's Involvement in Child Health Treatment Behavior in Nigeria: Implications for Child Health Care Delivery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Olaogun, Adenike, MScN, BNS, RN, RM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Principal Investigator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, Plot 9A, Adeleke Close, Rd 7, Ile -Ife, Nigeria</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">011-234-8033177428</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nikeolaogun@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Adejoke Ayoola, MScN, BNS, RN, RM, Predoctoral Student; Femi Adebayo, BS, Research Analyst; Christian Okemgbo, MSc, BS; Perpertua Obianjunwa, PhD; and Emmanuel Oluyemi, PhD, MSc, BS, Lecturer</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Fathers are an under-used resource for the improvement of child <br/> health, in most of the developing countries. To implement and sustain the <br/> child survival program in the developing world, there is a need to assess <br/> the roles of fathers in child health care. The Health belief model is the <br/> framework for the study. The father's health treatment behavior will <br/> depend on his ability to detect illness symptoms in his under-five year <br/> old child, give the symptoms a label or name, seek for alternative choices <br/> in resolving the symptoms, take decisions to resolve the problem and <br/> evaluate his actions. A cross sectional study was conducted in two <br/> communities and a total of 550 pairs of fathers and mothers (330 pairs in <br/> urban area and 220 pairs from rural area) who had a sick child within the <br/> last 4 weeks were interviewed using a pre-piloted questionnaire. Fathers <br/> and mothers agreed that mothers were the first to discover that child was <br/> sick. Majority, 91% of the fathers and 97.6% of mothers indicated they <br/> were personally involved in taking decisions and caring for their sick <br/> children. Only 7.7 % of fathers and 5.5% of mothers indicated joint <br/> decisions were made in the care of their child. Most respondents had low <br/> level of knowledge on the symptoms of diseases highlighted by the study. <br/> Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that on the first <br/> action taken in the care of child, (p=0.01) fathers are 7 times less <br/> likely to be personally involved in child treatment than mothers. Urban <br/> dwellers were more likely to take an action than rural dwellers. These <br/> findings buttress the urgent need for an educational program that will <br/> improve the knowledge of fathers about childhood illnesses. This will <br/> improve their identification of illness, participation in supporting both <br/> care and biomedical facility utilization in the care of their sick <br/> children. This will reduce the under -five morbidity and mortality.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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