2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161210
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of Pain and Well-being in Elderly Women: a 10-Year Longitudinal Study
Abstract:
Patterns of Pain and Well-being in Elderly Women: a 10-Year Longitudinal Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Phelan, Cynthia
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Contact Address:School of Nursing, K6/117 CSC, 600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608/695-3499
Co-Authors:Susan Heidrich, Professor
Pain in the elderly has been related to sleep disturbance, decreased socialization, impaired function, increased utilization of health care, anxiety, fatigue, and depression. However, the specific impact of pain on psychological well-being in the elderly has received little attention. This relationship was examined in a secondary analysis of a ten-year longitudinal study of chronic illness and psychological well-being in community-dwelling elderly women (N=243 at baseline, mean age=73.3). The ten-year study was generated in a developmentally-based model of well-being. Three questions were asked: 1. What is the pattern of pain over ten years? 2. Does well-being vary over time in relation to pain? and 3. Does health status vary over time in relation to pain? Participants completed mailed surveys of demographic information, pain, physical health (subjective health, functional health, chronic illnesses), psychological well-being (purpose in life, personal growth, positive relations, autonomy), and psychological distress (depression, anxiety) at baseline, 6 years, and 10 years. From baseline to 10 years, there were significant increases in the number of women reporting pain (53% to 73%) and in mean degree of bother from pain. A series of 3 (pain group) by 3 (time) ANOVAs examined health and well-being over time in women with no pain (baseline), those with pain but no bother, and those bothered by pain. Women bothered by pain, compared to women not bothered by pain, reported significantly worse subjective health, chronic conditions, and functional health. However, no effects were found for well-being or depression. Overall, these longitudinal data show that despite increases in pain and decline in physical health, there was no decline in well-being for women with pain. Future research should examine how older women maintain well-being despite increases in pain and address nursing care of persons with pain in old age. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of Pain and Well-being in Elderly Women: a 10-Year Longitudinal Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161210-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of Pain and Well-being in Elderly Women: a 10-Year Longitudinal Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Phelan, Cynthia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, K6/117 CSC, 600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608/695-3499</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">phelanhcc@tznet.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Heidrich, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain in the elderly has been related to sleep disturbance, decreased socialization, impaired function, increased utilization of health care, anxiety, fatigue, and depression. However, the specific impact of pain on psychological well-being in the elderly has received little attention. This relationship was examined in a secondary analysis of a ten-year longitudinal study of chronic illness and psychological well-being in community-dwelling elderly women (N=243 at baseline, mean age=73.3). The ten-year study was generated in a developmentally-based model of well-being. Three questions were asked: 1. What is the pattern of pain over ten years? 2. Does well-being vary over time in relation to pain? and 3. Does health status vary over time in relation to pain? Participants completed mailed surveys of demographic information, pain, physical health (subjective health, functional health, chronic illnesses), psychological well-being (purpose in life, personal growth, positive relations, autonomy), and psychological distress (depression, anxiety) at baseline, 6 years, and 10 years. From baseline to 10 years, there were significant increases in the number of women reporting pain (53% to 73%) and in mean degree of bother from pain. A series of 3 (pain group) by 3 (time) ANOVAs examined health and well-being over time in women with no pain (baseline), those with pain but no bother, and those bothered by pain. Women bothered by pain, compared to women not bothered by pain, reported significantly worse subjective health, chronic conditions, and functional health. However, no effects were found for well-being or depression. Overall, these longitudinal data show that despite increases in pain and decline in physical health, there was no decline in well-being for women with pain. Future research should examine how older women maintain well-being despite increases in pain and address nursing care of persons with pain in old age. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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