Healthy Eating Outcomes of a Tailored Intervention Among Midlife and Older Rural Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161212
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Healthy Eating Outcomes of a Tailored Intervention Among Midlife and Older Rural Women
Abstract:
Healthy Eating Outcomes of a Tailored Intervention Among Midlife and Older Rural Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Pullen, Carol, BSN, MSN, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Assistant Dean
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68122, USA
Contact Telephone:402-559-6548
Co-Authors:Susan Noble Walker, EdD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Linda S. Boeckner, PhD, RD, Professor; Patricia A. Hageman, PhD, PT, Professor; and Maureen K. Oberdorfer, MPA, BSMT, Project Coordinator
Purpose: Poor diet is among the leading causes of morbidity and
premature mortality in older women. The purpose of the study was to
determine if theory-based tailored newsletters were more effective than
generic newsletters in changing eating behaviors among rural midlife and
older women. Conceptual Framework: The intervention was framed within the
Health Promotion Model (Pender, 2002). Eating behavior as recommended in
the Healthy People 2010 Objectives was studied. Subjects: 225 women aged
50-69 recruited by random digit dialing from two geographically separate
communities. Methods: At two rural sites in the midwestern U.S., women
were supervised in responding to established reliable and valid
questionnaires on a computer. Eating behaviors were measured by the Block
Health Habit and History Questionnaire. An assessment of eating biomarkers
by the research nurse included lipids, body mass index, and % body fat
measured by bioimpedance analysis. The intervention consisted of 18
computer-generated tailored newsletters for the experimental group and 18
generic newsletters for the comparison group over a 12 month period.
Newsletters were sent every two weeks for six months and then monthly for
the next six months. Results and Conclusions: RM ANOVAs found significant
(.035 - .001) time effects at baseline, 6 & 12 months for all behavioral
markers except daily dairy servings and for the biomarkers of LDL-C and
BMI. Significant (<.05) time x group effects were found for daily fruit
and vegetable servings and % calories from saturated fats. Significant
decreases from baseline to 12 months were found for both groups for LDL-C;
the tailored group had increases in fruit and vegetables servings and
decreases in % calories from fat and saturated fat. Percentage of change
will be reported. Both tailored and generic newsletters influenced eating
behaviors and biomarkers; tailored newsletters had a greater influence
over time for some measures. Funded by NINR Grant No. R01 NR04861
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealthy Eating Outcomes of a Tailored Intervention Among Midlife and Older Rural Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161212-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Healthy Eating Outcomes of a Tailored Intervention Among Midlife and Older Rural Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pullen, Carol, BSN, MSN, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68122, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-559-6548</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chpullen@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Noble Walker, EdD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Linda S. Boeckner, PhD, RD, Professor; Patricia A. Hageman, PhD, PT, Professor; and Maureen K. Oberdorfer, MPA, BSMT, Project Coordinator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Poor diet is among the leading causes of morbidity and <br/> premature mortality in older women. The purpose of the study was to <br/> determine if theory-based tailored newsletters were more effective than <br/> generic newsletters in changing eating behaviors among rural midlife and <br/> older women. Conceptual Framework: The intervention was framed within the <br/> Health Promotion Model (Pender, 2002). Eating behavior as recommended in <br/> the Healthy People 2010 Objectives was studied. Subjects: 225 women aged <br/> 50-69 recruited by random digit dialing from two geographically separate <br/> communities. Methods: At two rural sites in the midwestern U.S., women <br/> were supervised in responding to established reliable and valid <br/> questionnaires on a computer. Eating behaviors were measured by the Block <br/> Health Habit and History Questionnaire. An assessment of eating biomarkers <br/> by the research nurse included lipids, body mass index, and % body fat <br/> measured by bioimpedance analysis. The intervention consisted of 18 <br/> computer-generated tailored newsletters for the experimental group and 18 <br/> generic newsletters for the comparison group over a 12 month period. <br/> Newsletters were sent every two weeks for six months and then monthly for <br/> the next six months. Results and Conclusions: RM ANOVAs found significant <br/> (.035 - .001) time effects at baseline, 6 &amp; 12 months for all behavioral <br/> markers except daily dairy servings and for the biomarkers of LDL-C and <br/> BMI. Significant (&lt;.05) time x group effects were found for daily fruit <br/> and vegetable servings and % calories from saturated fats. Significant <br/> decreases from baseline to 12 months were found for both groups for LDL-C; <br/> the tailored group had increases in fruit and vegetables servings and <br/> decreases in % calories from fat and saturated fat. Percentage of change <br/> will be reported. Both tailored and generic newsletters influenced eating <br/> behaviors and biomarkers; tailored newsletters had a greater influence <br/> over time for some measures. Funded by NINR Grant No. R01 NR04861</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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