One Year Evaluation of Outcomes Related to CVD Morbidity, Risk Reduction and Stress in a Law Enforcement Cohort Using the Precede-Proceed Health Planning Model

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161214
Type:
Presentation
Title:
One Year Evaluation of Outcomes Related to CVD Morbidity, Risk Reduction and Stress in a Law Enforcement Cohort Using the Precede-Proceed Health Planning Model
Abstract:
One Year Evaluation of Outcomes Related to CVD Morbidity, Risk Reduction and Stress in a Law Enforcement Cohort Using the Precede-Proceed Health Planning Model
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ramey, Sandra, PhD, MSN, BS
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Department, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:4142883857
Purpose: It remains uncertain whether law enforcement officers (LEOs)
have an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and, if so,
the extent to which stress affects this relationship. Efforts are needed
to develop, implement and evaluate strategies to reduce risks of CVD among
LEOs. Methods: Intended outcomes of this study included reduction of risk
for disease, specifically CVD, and promotion of overall health. This study
used triangulation of data from several sources including: (1) the
literature written over the past thirty years addressing morbidity and
mortality in LEOs, (2) interviews with LEOs, and (3) data obtained from
the administration of the Department of Public Safety. The Precede-Proceed
community-based planning approach to chronic disease prevention was
applied using a target population of LEOs employed by the Department of
Public Safety (DPS) in nine midwestern states. The self-reported
prevalence of CVD and CVD risk factors among 2,818 currently employed male
LEOs was compared to 9,650 male respondents. Utilizing the Proceed portion
of the planning model, one year later states were queried as to which
interventions were employed to address risk reduction. State
representatives were asked to identify which strategies were implemented
and to address any barriers that prohibited implementation of the
strategies that were recommended. Outcomes Evaluation: In Iowa, seven of
the eighteen intervention strategies were implemented. The physical
fitness program was reconsidered. Money and lack of structural support
were identified as barriers. Areas requiring additional support were
identified. Implications for practice: The results of the original study
suggest that stress may contribute to CVD among LEOs through potentiating
several CVD risk factors. Results indicate that organizational stress is
clearly an issue within the DPS, and that the organizational environment
appears to contribute to the stress perceived by the LEOs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOne Year Evaluation of Outcomes Related to CVD Morbidity, Risk Reduction and Stress in a Law Enforcement Cohort Using the Precede-Proceed Health Planning Modelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161214-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">One Year Evaluation of Outcomes Related to CVD Morbidity, Risk Reduction and Stress in a Law Enforcement Cohort Using the Precede-Proceed Health Planning Model</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ramey, Sandra, PhD, MSN, BS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">4142883857</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sandra.ramey@marquette.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: It remains uncertain whether law enforcement officers (LEOs) <br/> have an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and, if so, <br/> the extent to which stress affects this relationship. Efforts are needed <br/> to develop, implement and evaluate strategies to reduce risks of CVD among <br/> LEOs. Methods: Intended outcomes of this study included reduction of risk <br/> for disease, specifically CVD, and promotion of overall health. This study <br/> used triangulation of data from several sources including: (1) the <br/> literature written over the past thirty years addressing morbidity and <br/> mortality in LEOs, (2) interviews with LEOs, and (3) data obtained from <br/> the administration of the Department of Public Safety. The Precede-Proceed <br/> community-based planning approach to chronic disease prevention was <br/> applied using a target population of LEOs employed by the Department of <br/> Public Safety (DPS) in nine midwestern states. The self-reported <br/> prevalence of CVD and CVD risk factors among 2,818 currently employed male <br/> LEOs was compared to 9,650 male respondents. Utilizing the Proceed portion <br/> of the planning model, one year later states were queried as to which <br/> interventions were employed to address risk reduction. State <br/> representatives were asked to identify which strategies were implemented <br/> and to address any barriers that prohibited implementation of the <br/> strategies that were recommended. Outcomes Evaluation: In Iowa, seven of <br/> the eighteen intervention strategies were implemented. The physical <br/> fitness program was reconsidered. Money and lack of structural support <br/> were identified as barriers. Areas requiring additional support were <br/> identified. Implications for practice: The results of the original study <br/> suggest that stress may contribute to CVD among LEOs through potentiating <br/> several CVD risk factors. Results indicate that organizational stress is <br/> clearly an issue within the DPS, and that the organizational environment <br/> appears to contribute to the stress perceived by the LEOs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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