2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161216
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Herbs and Potential Interactions with Medications
Abstract:
Herbs and Potential Interactions with Medications
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Riffle, Kathryn, PhD, MPA, MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Methodist College of Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 415 St. Mark Place, Peoria, IL, 61603, USA
Contact Telephone:309-671-2797
Title: The Use of Herbs in Rural Primary Care Clinics and Their
Potential Interactions with Prescribed and Over the Counter Medications
The purpose of this study was address these research questions: (1) What
is the prevalence of the use of herbs by clients attending rural primary
care clinics? and (2) What are the potential interactions between herbs
and over the counter or prescribed medications? The theoretical framework,
based on Pender's work, examined relationships among clients, health
behaviors, and the environment. Health professionals are part of the
interpersonal environment exerting influence on persons throughout the
lifespan.
Methodology. The descriptive design involved a non-probability sample of
150 subjects enrolled in three rural southern clinics. Inclusion criteria
were: volunteer male and female subjects above 18 years of age who spoke
English and had regular clinic appointments. IRB approval was obtained. At
the study's conclusion, the names of participants taking herbs that had
potential interactions with prescribed or OTC medications were given to
their respective health providers. The interview tool, developed by Marcy
and Brown, elicited data on the use of herbs.
Findings: The sample of 150 subjects ranged in age from 18-91. Seventy one
percent (n=106) were female, while 29 percent (n=44) were male. Thirty two
percent (n=48) were African American, 65% (n=97) were Caucasian, 1% (n=1)
was Native American and 3% (n=4) were Hispanic. Data analysis revealed
that 59% (n=89) of the 150 study participants used herbs. Of those who
used herbs, 92% (n=82) used herbs concurrently with prescribed or OTC
medications. Forty four percent (n=36) of these subjects were using herbs
concurrently with medications with which they had the potential to
interact.
Conclusions: Health providers were not aware that their clients were using
herbs. Health providers need to elicit data concerning the use of herbs by
clients. In functioning as community educators, nurse practitioners can
increase public awareness of potential interactions between herbs and
prescribed and/or OTC medications.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHerbs and Potential Interactions with Medicationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161216-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Herbs and Potential Interactions with Medications</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Riffle, Kathryn, PhD, MPA, MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Methodist College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 415 St. Mark Place, Peoria, IL, 61603, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-671-2797</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kriffle@mmci.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Title: The Use of Herbs in Rural Primary Care Clinics and Their <br/> Potential Interactions with Prescribed and Over the Counter Medications<br/> The purpose of this study was address these research questions: (1) What <br/> is the prevalence of the use of herbs by clients attending rural primary <br/> care clinics? and (2) What are the potential interactions between herbs <br/> and over the counter or prescribed medications? The theoretical framework, <br/> based on Pender's work, examined relationships among clients, health <br/> behaviors, and the environment. Health professionals are part of the <br/> interpersonal environment exerting influence on persons throughout the <br/> lifespan. <br/> Methodology. The descriptive design involved a non-probability sample of <br/> 150 subjects enrolled in three rural southern clinics. Inclusion criteria <br/> were: volunteer male and female subjects above 18 years of age who spoke <br/> English and had regular clinic appointments. IRB approval was obtained. At <br/> the study's conclusion, the names of participants taking herbs that had <br/> potential interactions with prescribed or OTC medications were given to <br/> their respective health providers. The interview tool, developed by Marcy <br/> and Brown, elicited data on the use of herbs. <br/> Findings: The sample of 150 subjects ranged in age from 18-91. Seventy one <br/> percent (n=106) were female, while 29 percent (n=44) were male. Thirty two <br/> percent (n=48) were African American, 65% (n=97) were Caucasian, 1% (n=1) <br/> was Native American and 3% (n=4) were Hispanic. Data analysis revealed <br/> that 59% (n=89) of the 150 study participants used herbs. Of those who <br/> used herbs, 92% (n=82) used herbs concurrently with prescribed or OTC <br/> medications. Forty four percent (n=36) of these subjects were using herbs <br/> concurrently with medications with which they had the potential to <br/> interact.<br/> Conclusions: Health providers were not aware that their clients were using <br/> herbs. Health providers need to elicit data concerning the use of herbs by <br/> clients. In functioning as community educators, nurse practitioners can <br/> increase public awareness of potential interactions between herbs and <br/> prescribed and/or OTC medications.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.