The Lived Experience and Self-care Practices of Thai, HIV-Positive, Postpartum Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161218
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Lived Experience and Self-care Practices of Thai, HIV-Positive, Postpartum Women
Abstract:
The Lived Experience and Self-care Practices of Thai, HIV-Positive, Postpartum Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ross, Ratchneewan, PhD, MScN, BscN
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO BOX 5190, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Contact Telephone:330-672-8785
Co-Authors:Wilaiphan Sawatphanit, MSN, BscN, Assistant Professor
Purpose: To explore the lived experiences and self-care practices
among Thai, HIV-positive, postpartum women
Theoretical Framework: Hermeneutic phenomenology guided the study.
Subjects and Method: In-depth interviews with open-ended questions were
conducted with five postpartum women in Thailand. The sample size was
justified through data saturation. The interviews took place at the
participants' homes from December, 2003 through April, 2004. All
interviews were taped recorded and field notes were taken. Data were
analyzed using Giorgi's method.
Results: All of the women were Buddhist and married. Their ages ranged
from 17 to 29 years old. All had received the virus from their husbands.
They lived with fears, uncertainty, and sufferings after the recognition
of their infection. The women guarded their social status through their
concealment of the infection. Their Buddhist beliefs, which included Karma
(retribution) and The Truth of Life (no man is immortal), helped them to
deal with their condition. The relationships between husband and wife were
strained after the recognition of the infection. Over time, however, the
husbands became more supportive, tangibly and emotionally. The
participants' self-care practices gradually improved after the recognition
of the virus. They began to eat nutritious food, rest, and exercise
according to nurses' and doctors' instructions. They tried to stay as
healthy as they could for their babies, who were their hope and will
power. The couples used condoms. The decision to use condoms was made by
the husbands. Finally, the participants were receptive to new information
regarding HIV, but were not motivated to seek it out for themselves.
Conclusions: Understanding an HIV-positive postpartum woman's lived
experience and self-care practices is important. Nursing care, self-care
instructions, and emotional support should be tailored to each individual
woman's beliefs, life context, and self-care practices.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Lived Experience and Self-care Practices of Thai, HIV-Positive, Postpartum Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161218-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Lived Experience and Self-care Practices of Thai, HIV-Positive, Postpartum Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ross, Ratchneewan, PhD, MScN, BscN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO BOX 5190, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-672-8785</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rross1@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Wilaiphan Sawatphanit, MSN, BscN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To explore the lived experiences and self-care practices <br/> among Thai, HIV-positive, postpartum women <br/> Theoretical Framework: Hermeneutic phenomenology guided the study.<br/> Subjects and Method: In-depth interviews with open-ended questions were <br/> conducted with five postpartum women in Thailand. The sample size was <br/> justified through data saturation. The interviews took place at the <br/> participants' homes from December, 2003 through April, 2004. All <br/> interviews were taped recorded and field notes were taken. Data were <br/> analyzed using Giorgi's method. <br/> Results: All of the women were Buddhist and married. Their ages ranged <br/> from 17 to 29 years old. All had received the virus from their husbands. <br/> They lived with fears, uncertainty, and sufferings after the recognition <br/> of their infection. The women guarded their social status through their <br/> concealment of the infection. Their Buddhist beliefs, which included Karma <br/> (retribution) and The Truth of Life (no man is immortal), helped them to <br/> deal with their condition. The relationships between husband and wife were <br/> strained after the recognition of the infection. Over time, however, the <br/> husbands became more supportive, tangibly and emotionally. The <br/> participants' self-care practices gradually improved after the recognition <br/> of the virus. They began to eat nutritious food, rest, and exercise <br/> according to nurses' and doctors' instructions. They tried to stay as <br/> healthy as they could for their babies, who were their hope and will <br/> power. The couples used condoms. The decision to use condoms was made by <br/> the husbands. Finally, the participants were receptive to new information <br/> regarding HIV, but were not motivated to seek it out for themselves.<br/> Conclusions: Understanding an HIV-positive postpartum woman's lived <br/> experience and self-care practices is important. Nursing care, self-care <br/> instructions, and emotional support should be tailored to each individual <br/> woman's beliefs, life context, and self-care practices.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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