2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161221
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Culture of African American Prenatal and Infant Care
Abstract:
Culture of African American Prenatal and Infant Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Savage, Christine, PhD, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Community and Mental Health Nursing, PO Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA
Contact Telephone:513-558-5241
Co-Authors:Jean S. Anthony, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN, Assistant Professor and Rebecca Lee, BSN, Graduate Research Assistant
Background: In Hamilton County, Ohio, the infant mortality rate for
African American infants in 2001 was 19.5 per 1,000 live births compared
to 6.4 for white infants (Ohio Department of Health, 2004). Despite
efforts to address this disparity, the rate has increased over the past
decade (Figure 1). Identification of cultural factors that contribute to
this high rate is essential in the development of culturally relevant
nursing interventions. The purpose of the study was to explore the
cultural context of pregnancy and infant care practices among African
American women of childbearing age Methods: This was an ethnographic study
using an academic partnership model. Community partners provided guidance
in relation to cultural relevance, recruitment procedures and final data
analysis. Seven African American women were recruited. The data was
analyzed through coding of the transcripts, identification of emerging
themes, and triangulation with the participants and the community
partners. The women viewed their pregnancy as an interruption in their
plans for the future. Most did not recognize their pregnancy until late in
the first trimester or the second trimester. They worried that their
infant would not be healthy. Stress related to infant care was discussed
by all of the women. Mothers and grandmothers were seen as sources of
emotional support and physical help. The main barrier to care was
transportation. Conclusions: A strong family-based social network was core
to the culture of pregnancy and infant care for these women. This provides
nurses with an opportunity to develop family centered culturally relevant
interventions that build on this strength. However, the fact that
pregnancies were unplanned indicates that education efforts related to
prevention of infant mortality in this population should be initiated with
African American women of childbearing age and not be confined to parental
care. Acknowledgements: Funded by the University of Cincinnati Research
Council .
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCulture of African American Prenatal and Infant Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161221-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Culture of African American Prenatal and Infant Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Savage, Christine, PhD, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Community and Mental Health Nursing, PO Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513-558-5241</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">christine.savage@uc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jean S. Anthony, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN, Assistant Professor and Rebecca Lee, BSN, Graduate Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: In Hamilton County, Ohio, the infant mortality rate for <br/> African American infants in 2001 was 19.5 per 1,000 live births compared <br/> to 6.4 for white infants (Ohio Department of Health, 2004). Despite <br/> efforts to address this disparity, the rate has increased over the past <br/> decade (Figure 1). Identification of cultural factors that contribute to <br/> this high rate is essential in the development of culturally relevant <br/> nursing interventions. The purpose of the study was to explore the <br/> cultural context of pregnancy and infant care practices among African <br/> American women of childbearing age Methods: This was an ethnographic study <br/> using an academic partnership model. Community partners provided guidance <br/> in relation to cultural relevance, recruitment procedures and final data <br/> analysis. Seven African American women were recruited. The data was <br/> analyzed through coding of the transcripts, identification of emerging <br/> themes, and triangulation with the participants and the community <br/> partners. The women viewed their pregnancy as an interruption in their <br/> plans for the future. Most did not recognize their pregnancy until late in <br/> the first trimester or the second trimester. They worried that their <br/> infant would not be healthy. Stress related to infant care was discussed <br/> by all of the women. Mothers and grandmothers were seen as sources of <br/> emotional support and physical help. The main barrier to care was <br/> transportation. Conclusions: A strong family-based social network was core <br/> to the culture of pregnancy and infant care for these women. This provides <br/> nurses with an opportunity to develop family centered culturally relevant <br/> interventions that build on this strength. However, the fact that <br/> pregnancies were unplanned indicates that education efforts related to <br/> prevention of infant mortality in this population should be initiated with <br/> African American women of childbearing age and not be confined to parental <br/> care. Acknowledgements: Funded by the University of Cincinnati Research <br/> Council .</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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