2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161222
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coping Behaviors of Low-Income Pregnant Women Attempting Smoking Cessation
Abstract:
Coping Behaviors of Low-Income Pregnant Women Attempting Smoking Cessation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Scheibmeir, Monica, PhD, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:9135881664
Co-Authors:Debbie Mackey, BSN, Graduate Research Assistant; Jessica Pedersen, BSN, Graduate Research Assistant; Shala Swarm, BSN, Graduate Research Assistant; and Catherine Wallace, BSN, Graduate Research Assistant
x
Coping Behaviors of Low-Income Pregnant Women Attempting
Smoking Cessation Purpose: It is unclear what types of coping strategies
"spontaneous" quitters use during pregnancy to avoid smoking. Relapse
rates following delivery exceed 50% of those women who attempt smoking
cessation during pregnancy, so identifying functional coping strategies
among successful quitters would be of benefit . The purpose of this study
was to explore the types, frequency, and effectiveness of coping
strategies used by low-income women who were attempting to stop smoking in
early pregnancy. Theoretical Framework: A grounded theory approach was
used to describe the process of quitting smoking during pregnancy for
low-income pregnant ex-smokers. Sample: 60 pregnant women who
self-reported as an ex-smoker were recruited to participate in a
longitudinal study to examine coping strategies over the course of the
pregnancy and in the postpartum period. Of the 60 self-reported
ex-smokers, 49 had biological confirmation of their smoking status.
Method: Face-to-face interviews were scheduled for a total of three times
over the course of pregnancy and postpartum. The first interview was
conducted prior to the 20th week of gestation. The second interview took
place between the 28th and 34th week of pregnancy, and the last interview
was scheduled to occur between the 8th and 12th weeks postpartum. Women
were asked to describe how they handled an urge or temptation to smoke. In
addition, they were given the opportunity to talk about other strategies
they used to avoid getting urges to smoke while pregnant. Results: Data
analysis is on-going at this time. Preliminary findings from the first and
second interviews suggest that strategies identified in early pregnancy
that assist with not smoking (fatigue, nausea, thinking about the harm to
the baby) are not used in the latter part of pregnancy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCoping Behaviors of Low-Income Pregnant Women Attempting Smoking Cessationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161222-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Coping Behaviors of Low-Income Pregnant Women Attempting Smoking Cessation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scheibmeir, Monica, PhD, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">9135881664</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mscheibm@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Debbie Mackey, BSN, Graduate Research Assistant; Jessica Pedersen, BSN, Graduate Research Assistant; Shala Swarm, BSN, Graduate Research Assistant; and Catherine Wallace, BSN, Graduate Research Assistant<br/>x</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Coping Behaviors of Low-Income Pregnant Women Attempting <br/> Smoking Cessation Purpose: It is unclear what types of coping strategies <br/> &quot;spontaneous&quot; quitters use during pregnancy to avoid smoking. Relapse <br/> rates following delivery exceed 50% of those women who attempt smoking <br/> cessation during pregnancy, so identifying functional coping strategies <br/> among successful quitters would be of benefit . The purpose of this study <br/> was to explore the types, frequency, and effectiveness of coping <br/> strategies used by low-income women who were attempting to stop smoking in <br/> early pregnancy. Theoretical Framework: A grounded theory approach was <br/> used to describe the process of quitting smoking during pregnancy for <br/> low-income pregnant ex-smokers. Sample: 60 pregnant women who <br/> self-reported as an ex-smoker were recruited to participate in a <br/> longitudinal study to examine coping strategies over the course of the <br/> pregnancy and in the postpartum period. Of the 60 self-reported <br/> ex-smokers, 49 had biological confirmation of their smoking status. <br/> Method: Face-to-face interviews were scheduled for a total of three times <br/> over the course of pregnancy and postpartum. The first interview was <br/> conducted prior to the 20th week of gestation. The second interview took <br/> place between the 28th and 34th week of pregnancy, and the last interview <br/> was scheduled to occur between the 8th and 12th weeks postpartum. Women <br/> were asked to describe how they handled an urge or temptation to smoke. In <br/> addition, they were given the opportunity to talk about other strategies <br/> they used to avoid getting urges to smoke while pregnant. Results: Data <br/> analysis is on-going at this time. Preliminary findings from the first and <br/> second interviews suggest that strategies identified in early pregnancy <br/> that assist with not smoking (fatigue, nausea, thinking about the harm to <br/> the baby) are not used in the latter part of pregnancy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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