2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161225
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender Differences in Experiencing Depression after Acute Coronary Event
Abstract:
Gender Differences in Experiencing Depression after Acute Coronary Event
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Shin, Nah-Mee, PhDc, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 2230 Cram Place # 7, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105, USA
Contact Telephone:734-647-4520
Co-Authors:Bonnie Hagerty, PhD, CNS, RN, Associate Professor; Cynthia Arslanian-Engoren, PhD, MSN, BSN,
CNS, Assistant Professor; and Reg Williams, FAAN, PhD, CS, Professor
The evidence that depression affects post-coronary prognosis is
growing and depression is a powerful independent predictor of mortality
and morbidity. Therefore, decreasing a risk for depression should be
addressed as the leading issue in the recovery process for patients with
Acute Coronary Events(ACE). This study compared 50 male and 50 female
survivors over one month period after ACE. The study finding shows that
men and women survivors appear to be different in experiencing symptoms of
depression. Information that contributes to an understanding of why female
survivors seem to have more depressive symptoms than male in their post
ACE life is especially crucial to health care providers who work closely
with them. Although quality of recovery after ACE may be affected by
several factors, subjectivity in appraisal of interpreting and responding
to ACE might be able to provide a critical way to explain the individual
variations in experiencing depression seen among survivors. Thus, this
study is to examine the concept of resilient coping capacity (RCC), or how
one views their cardiac event and its meaning, and its relationship to
depression. This study uses a longitudinal design to test changes in RCC
and depression prior to hospital discharge and one month
post-hospitalization. Key variables in this study are derived from major
components in well-established theories, Transactional Model of Stress and
Coping (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984) and Theory of Sense of Coherence
(Antonovsky, 1979). These two theories underpin the flow of the phenomena
that emphasize cognitive functions in mediating the significance of
perceived threat from the life-threatening experience with ACE. The
findings from this study suggest individualized approach with better
understanding of gender differences in interventions to promote their
psychological health and coping after a cardiac event.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender Differences in Experiencing Depression after Acute Coronary Eventen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161225-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender Differences in Experiencing Depression after Acute Coronary Event</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shin, Nah-Mee, PhDc, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 2230 Cram Place # 7, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-647-4520</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nshin@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bonnie Hagerty, PhD, CNS, RN, Associate Professor; Cynthia Arslanian-Engoren, PhD, MSN, BSN, <br/> CNS, Assistant Professor; and Reg Williams, FAAN, PhD, CS, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The evidence that depression affects post-coronary prognosis is <br/> growing and depression is a powerful independent predictor of mortality <br/> and morbidity. Therefore, decreasing a risk for depression should be <br/> addressed as the leading issue in the recovery process for patients with <br/> Acute Coronary Events(ACE). This study compared 50 male and 50 female <br/> survivors over one month period after ACE. The study finding shows that <br/> men and women survivors appear to be different in experiencing symptoms of <br/> depression. Information that contributes to an understanding of why female <br/> survivors seem to have more depressive symptoms than male in their post <br/> ACE life is especially crucial to health care providers who work closely <br/> with them. Although quality of recovery after ACE may be affected by <br/> several factors, subjectivity in appraisal of interpreting and responding <br/> to ACE might be able to provide a critical way to explain the individual <br/> variations in experiencing depression seen among survivors. Thus, this <br/> study is to examine the concept of resilient coping capacity (RCC), or how <br/> one views their cardiac event and its meaning, and its relationship to <br/> depression. This study uses a longitudinal design to test changes in RCC <br/> and depression prior to hospital discharge and one month <br/> post-hospitalization. Key variables in this study are derived from major <br/> components in well-established theories, Transactional Model of Stress and <br/> Coping (Lazarus &amp; Folkman, 1984) and Theory of Sense of Coherence <br/> (Antonovsky, 1979). These two theories underpin the flow of the phenomena <br/> that emphasize cognitive functions in mediating the significance of <br/> perceived threat from the life-threatening experience with ACE. The <br/> findings from this study suggest individualized approach with better <br/> understanding of gender differences in interventions to promote their <br/> psychological health and coping after a cardiac event.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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