2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161227
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychometric Testing of the Meaning in Heart Disease Instrument
Abstract:
Psychometric Testing of the Meaning in Heart Disease Instrument
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Skaggs, Brenda
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1321 Greenway Dr., Oklahoma City, OK, 73127, USA
Contact Telephone:405-270-0501
Co-Authors:Bernice Yates, Associate Dean for Research; Cecilia Barron; Melody Hertzog, Assistant Professor; Joseph Norman, Associate Professor; and Bunny Pozehl, Associate Professor
Problem: While individuals who undergo percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) expect to "get back to normal," symptoms may return resulting in decreased functional status. Decreased functioning may be related to the "meaning" attached to the heart disease as it interrupts the life experience. Searching for meaning in heart disease has not been studied quantitatively, and, since an instrument to measure these meaning-based coping processes was not available, the Meaning in Heart Disease instrument (MHD) was developed. The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the MHD in patients who underwent PCI. Theoretical/conceptual framework: The MHD was developed based on the cognitive appraisal model and reflects the process of searching for meaning. When a significant, negatively appraised event (e.g. cardiac event) occurs, individuals try to understand what has happened, try to make the event fit in with life, or change the purpose/direction of life. Subjects: 232 individuals who underwent PCI. Methodology: A prospective, survey design was used. Invitations to participate were extended via the mail. Interested individuals who returned a response card were screened for eligibility and received study materials (MHD, SF-36v2TM, Seattle Angina Questionnaire, MacNew, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Personal Mastery Scale) via the mail. Reliability analysis, factor analysis, and correlations were used to examine the psychometric properties of the MHD. Results: Four scales emerged during preliminary analysisùShattered Meaning (? =.93), Refocusing Global Meaning (?=.93), Searching for Answers (?=.82), and Ignoring Heart Disease (?=.77).
Implications: The MHD shows promise as a measure of meaning-based coping processes related to heart disease. It is expected to be useful in testing the effects of cognitive therapy-based nursing interventions aimed at helping individuals integrate heart disease into the life experience.(Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychometric Testing of the Meaning in Heart Disease Instrumenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161227-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychometric Testing of the Meaning in Heart Disease Instrument</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Skaggs, Brenda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1321 Greenway Dr., Oklahoma City, OK, 73127, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">405-270-0501</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">brendaskaggs@cox.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bernice Yates, Associate Dean for Research; Cecilia Barron; Melody Hertzog, Assistant Professor; Joseph Norman, Associate Professor; and Bunny Pozehl, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: While individuals who undergo percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) expect to &quot;get back to normal,&quot; symptoms may return resulting in decreased functional status. Decreased functioning may be related to the &quot;meaning&quot; attached to the heart disease as it interrupts the life experience. Searching for meaning in heart disease has not been studied quantitatively, and, since an instrument to measure these meaning-based coping processes was not available, the Meaning in Heart Disease instrument (MHD) was developed. The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the MHD in patients who underwent PCI. Theoretical/conceptual framework: The MHD was developed based on the cognitive appraisal model and reflects the process of searching for meaning. When a significant, negatively appraised event (e.g. cardiac event) occurs, individuals try to understand what has happened, try to make the event fit in with life, or change the purpose/direction of life. Subjects: 232 individuals who underwent PCI. Methodology: A prospective, survey design was used. Invitations to participate were extended via the mail. Interested individuals who returned a response card were screened for eligibility and received study materials (MHD, SF-36v2TM, Seattle Angina Questionnaire, MacNew, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Personal Mastery Scale) via the mail. Reliability analysis, factor analysis, and correlations were used to examine the psychometric properties of the MHD. Results: Four scales emerged during preliminary analysis&ugrave;Shattered Meaning (? =.93), Refocusing Global Meaning (?=.93), Searching for Answers (?=.82), and Ignoring Heart Disease (?=.77). <br/>Implications: The MHD shows promise as a measure of meaning-based coping processes related to heart disease. It is expected to be useful in testing the effects of cognitive therapy-based nursing interventions aimed at helping individuals integrate heart disease into the life experience.(Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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