What is the pattern of drinking in non-alcohol dependents prior to alcohol-related vehicular injuries?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161229
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What is the pattern of drinking in non-alcohol dependents prior to alcohol-related vehicular injuries?
Abstract:
What is the pattern of drinking in non-alcohol dependents prior to alcohol-related vehicular injuries?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Sommers, Marilyn, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Associate Dean
Contact Address:Nursing Research Division, 3110 Vine Street, Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA
Contact Telephone:513 558 5368
Co-Authors:Steven R. Howe, PhD, Professor; Janice Dyehouse, PhD, Professor; Jamison Fargo, PhD, Assistant Professor; and John Schafer, PhD, Associate Professor
More than 17,000 Americans die annually in alcohol-related motor
vehicle crashes (ARMVC) and many more are injured. Purpose: The specific
aim of the study was to determine if drinking patterns on the days
immediately prior to an ARMVC were significantly different than those in
the weeks prior to the crash. Theoretical Framework: Crisis intervention
theory suggests that an alcohol-related crash offers a teachable moment to
change drinking behaviors. A change in drinking patterns can serve as a
warning that higher risk for injury exists. Subjects: Following an ARMVC,
187 hospitalized non-alcohol dependent young-adults were enrolled. Mean
age was 29.03 and mean blood alcohol level was 165.18. Method: Subjects
were interviewed to determine the quantity/frequency of standard drinks
during the 28 days prior to the crash. Drinks/day was determined, with day
1 considered 4 weeks prior to the crash and day 28 the day of the crash.
Results: A random-intercepts general linear mixed model was used to test
the effect of several covariates (segment 1 (days 1-26), segment 2 (days
27-28), age, sex, race, holiday/non-holiday period, driver/passenger
status, and weekend/weekday crash) on standard drinks/day. Results
indicated no significant interactions among the covariates. The only
significant predictors of drinks/day were segment 2 (b=.322, p < .0001)
and gender (b=-.221 p=.016). The positive, statistically significant slope
for segment 2 indicated an increase in consumption of drinks/day in the
two-day period prior to the ARMVC and the negative slope for sex indicated
greater consumption of drinks/day for men than women. Conclusions: We
found that persons injured in an ARMVC have a significant increase in
alcohol consumption on the day before and the day of vehicular crashes as
compared to the first 26 days preceding the crash. This information can be
used in targeted interventions to reduce risky drinking.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat is the pattern of drinking in non-alcohol dependents prior to alcohol-related vehicular injuries?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161229-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">What is the pattern of drinking in non-alcohol dependents prior to alcohol-related vehicular injuries?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sommers, Marilyn, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Research Division, 3110 Vine Street, Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513 558 5368</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Lynn.Sommers@UC.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Steven R. Howe, PhD, Professor; Janice Dyehouse, PhD, Professor; Jamison Fargo, PhD, Assistant Professor; and John Schafer, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">More than 17,000 Americans die annually in alcohol-related motor <br/> vehicle crashes (ARMVC) and many more are injured. Purpose: The specific <br/> aim of the study was to determine if drinking patterns on the days <br/> immediately prior to an ARMVC were significantly different than those in <br/> the weeks prior to the crash. Theoretical Framework: Crisis intervention <br/> theory suggests that an alcohol-related crash offers a teachable moment to <br/> change drinking behaviors. A change in drinking patterns can serve as a <br/> warning that higher risk for injury exists. Subjects: Following an ARMVC, <br/> 187 hospitalized non-alcohol dependent young-adults were enrolled. Mean <br/> age was 29.03 and mean blood alcohol level was 165.18. Method: Subjects <br/> were interviewed to determine the quantity/frequency of standard drinks <br/> during the 28 days prior to the crash. Drinks/day was determined, with day <br/> 1 considered 4 weeks prior to the crash and day 28 the day of the crash. <br/> Results: A random-intercepts general linear mixed model was used to test <br/> the effect of several covariates (segment 1 (days 1-26), segment 2 (days <br/> 27-28), age, sex, race, holiday/non-holiday period, driver/passenger <br/> status, and weekend/weekday crash) on standard drinks/day. Results <br/> indicated no significant interactions among the covariates. The only <br/> significant predictors of drinks/day were segment 2 (b=.322, p &lt; .0001) <br/> and gender (b=-.221 p=.016). The positive, statistically significant slope <br/> for segment 2 indicated an increase in consumption of drinks/day in the <br/> two-day period prior to the ARMVC and the negative slope for sex indicated <br/> greater consumption of drinks/day for men than women. Conclusions: We <br/> found that persons injured in an ARMVC have a significant increase in <br/> alcohol consumption on the day before and the day of vehicular crashes as <br/> compared to the first 26 days preceding the crash. This information can be <br/> used in targeted interventions to reduce risky drinking.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:17:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:17:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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