2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161230
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Grandmothers' Life Changes for Grandchildren
Abstract:
Grandmothers' Life Changes for Grandchildren
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Standing, Theresa, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-5990
Co-Authors:Carol M. Musil, PhD, Associate Professor and Camille Warner, PhD, Project Director
Over 2 million grandmothers provide either primary or supplemental
care to grandchildren living in their homes. These caregiving roles are
sometimes in flux as living arrangements change and parents assume more or
less responsibility for their children, but such changes in grandmothers'
caregiving status to grandchildren have received little attention. The
purpose of this study was to learn how grandmothers perceive these changes
in family composition. The philosophical framework underpinning this
qualitative study was hermeneutic phenomenology which seeks to elicit and
describe the meaning of human experiences. Changes in caregiving status
provide an opportunity to reflect on the meaning of caregiving. This
phenomenological study is part of a larger, longitudinal study of
primary/custodial caregiving grandmothers, grandmothers in
intergenerational homes and grandmothers without caregiving
responsibility. Of 421 grandmothers, 86 have reported changes in
caregiving status between Time 1 and Time 3. Twenty one of these
grandmothers participated in semi-structured telephone interviews. A
grand-tour question, "Tell me the story of the changes in your family
during the past year" guided the interviews which were recorded,
transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using the Giorgi method of thematic
analysis. Lincoln & Guba's (1985) criteria were used to insure the rigor
of the study. The 15 Euro-American and 6 African-American grandmothers
ranged in age from 32 to 66 years (M=56.8). The majority of status changes
were from intergenerational to non-caregiving status (n=11). The meaning
of the changes differed by status groups. Analysis identified themes
including Getting My Life Back, Devotion to Grandchildren, Unpredicted
Changes, and Spirituality as Strength. The frequency of caregiving changes
and the unique meanings that such changes hold extends our understanding
of grandmothers as caregivers to children. Increased understanding of this
caregiver role is important knowledge for nurses as they provide health
care for this growing population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGrandmothers' Life Changes for Grandchildrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161230-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Grandmothers' Life Changes for Grandchildren</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Standing, Theresa, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-5990</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tss2@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol M. Musil, PhD, Associate Professor and Camille Warner, PhD, Project Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Over 2 million grandmothers provide either primary or supplemental <br/> care to grandchildren living in their homes. These caregiving roles are <br/> sometimes in flux as living arrangements change and parents assume more or <br/> less responsibility for their children, but such changes in grandmothers'<br/> caregiving status to grandchildren have received little attention. The <br/> purpose of this study was to learn how grandmothers perceive these changes <br/> in family composition. The philosophical framework underpinning this <br/> qualitative study was hermeneutic phenomenology which seeks to elicit and <br/> describe the meaning of human experiences. Changes in caregiving status <br/> provide an opportunity to reflect on the meaning of caregiving. This <br/> phenomenological study is part of a larger, longitudinal study of <br/> primary/custodial caregiving grandmothers, grandmothers in <br/> intergenerational homes and grandmothers without caregiving <br/> responsibility. Of 421 grandmothers, 86 have reported changes in <br/> caregiving status between Time 1 and Time 3. Twenty one of these <br/> grandmothers participated in semi-structured telephone interviews. A <br/> grand-tour question, &quot;Tell me the story of the changes in your family <br/> during the past year&quot; guided the interviews which were recorded, <br/> transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using the Giorgi method of thematic <br/> analysis. Lincoln &amp; Guba's (1985) criteria were used to insure the rigor <br/> of the study. The 15 Euro-American and 6 African-American grandmothers <br/> ranged in age from 32 to 66 years (M=56.8). The majority of status changes <br/> were from intergenerational to non-caregiving status (n=11). The meaning <br/> of the changes differed by status groups. Analysis identified themes <br/> including Getting My Life Back, Devotion to Grandchildren, Unpredicted <br/> Changes, and Spirituality as Strength. The frequency of caregiving changes <br/> and the unique meanings that such changes hold extends our understanding <br/> of grandmothers as caregivers to children. Increased understanding of this <br/> caregiver role is important knowledge for nurses as they provide health <br/> care for this growing population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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