2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161231
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self and Family Care of Peripubescent Perinatally-HIV Infected Children
Abstract:
Self and Family Care of Peripubescent Perinatally-HIV Infected Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Stieglitz, Kimberly, DNSc, APRN, BC, PNP
P.I. Institution Name:Doisy College of Health Science
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3625 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 64104, USA
Contact Telephone:314-977-8948
Children with HIV who are approaching and experiencing puberty
challenge providers in unprecedented ways. In the last decade,
improvements in medical treatment for HIV have resulted in higher survival
rates across the lifespan. Infected infants have grown into adolescence
and young adulthood. Decreasing morbidity and improved quality of life
have led many youth into all of the usual challenges of managing a chronic
illness when they want to be like peers, and adolescent development,
including risky behaviors such as sexual experimentation, taking
ôholidaysö from HIV medications, and use of illicit substances and
alcohol. The purpose of this study is to explore and describe how pre- and
early adolescents manage their perinatally acquired HIV illness while
experiencing rapid developmental changes and transitioning to self-care.
The research objectives include explicating what: self-care activities are
taking place; care activities family caregivers are performing; beliefs
exist regarding an order or progression of acquisition of self-care
responsibility; the critical issues for the peripubescent youth for
self-care; and beliefs about the kinds of sexual health behaviors taking
place. The Family Management Styles conceptual framework organizes the
study. Focused ethnography is the theoretical tradition and research
method to be used, allowing for eliciting information on a special topic
or shared experiences of participants. The sample consists of family dyads
with peripubescent youth aged 8-14 years with perinatal HIV and one adult
caregiver of varied race/ethnicities from a Midwestern clinic population.
The primary data are from interviews and field notes. This project has the
potential to fill the gaps in utilization of the FMS in HIV, sociocultural
health beliefs in HIV care, how peripubescent children and their families
manage HIV, and to contribute to the growing body of knowledge of
self-care in chronic illness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf and Family Care of Peripubescent Perinatally-HIV Infected Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161231-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self and Family Care of Peripubescent Perinatally-HIV Infected Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stieglitz, Kimberly, DNSc, APRN, BC, PNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Doisy College of Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3625 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 64104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-977-8948</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kstiegl1@slu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Children with HIV who are approaching and experiencing puberty <br/> challenge providers in unprecedented ways. In the last decade, <br/> improvements in medical treatment for HIV have resulted in higher survival <br/> rates across the lifespan. Infected infants have grown into adolescence <br/> and young adulthood. Decreasing morbidity and improved quality of life <br/> have led many youth into all of the usual challenges of managing a chronic <br/> illness when they want to be like peers, and adolescent development, <br/> including risky behaviors such as sexual experimentation, taking <br/> &ocirc;holidays&ouml; from HIV medications, and use of illicit substances and <br/> alcohol. The purpose of this study is to explore and describe how pre- and <br/> early adolescents manage their perinatally acquired HIV illness while <br/> experiencing rapid developmental changes and transitioning to self-care. <br/> The research objectives include explicating what: self-care activities are <br/> taking place; care activities family caregivers are performing; beliefs <br/> exist regarding an order or progression of acquisition of self-care <br/> responsibility; the critical issues for the peripubescent youth for <br/> self-care; and beliefs about the kinds of sexual health behaviors taking <br/> place. The Family Management Styles conceptual framework organizes the <br/> study. Focused ethnography is the theoretical tradition and research <br/> method to be used, allowing for eliciting information on a special topic <br/> or shared experiences of participants. The sample consists of family dyads <br/> with peripubescent youth aged 8-14 years with perinatal HIV and one adult <br/> caregiver of varied race/ethnicities from a Midwestern clinic population. <br/> The primary data are from interviews and field notes. This project has the <br/> potential to fill the gaps in utilization of the FMS in HIV, sociocultural <br/> health beliefs in HIV care, how peripubescent children and their families <br/> manage HIV, and to contribute to the growing body of knowledge of <br/> self-care in chronic illness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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