2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161232
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hand Hygiene in Critical Care Areas
Abstract:
Hand Hygiene in Critical Care Areas
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Sullivan, Erin, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Graduate Research Assistant
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 3110 Vine St., Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA
Contact Telephone:(513) 558-5234
Co-Authors:Francine Kidd, BSN, RN; Rebeckah Williams, RN; and Kyra Whitmer, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Problem/PurposeùAppropriate hand hygiene has been identified as a key
component in preventing the spread of infections. The CDC recently
published new hand hygiene guidelines. JCAHOÆs Patient Safety Goal #7 also
addressed hand hygiene. As part of this goal, hospitals must provide data
on appropriate staff utilization of hand hygiene. This study was designed
to provide a level I trauma center with data on hand hygiene compliance
within their critical care areas as well as helping to identify personnel
in need of additional focused education on hand hygiene.
Methods/FindingsùBandura's Social Cognitive Theory was used to design this
study. This theory proposes a reciprocal relationship between
environmental factors, personal factors (i.e. cognitive processes), and
behaviors. A blind observation of hand hygiene practices was conducted.
Staff was informed a graduate student would be on the unit to observe
"traffic patterns". All staff members within the unit were subject to
observation; no individual identifiers were collected. The student was
present during 6-hour blocks over 4 days so that all shifts were
represented. The student was positioned in a centralized location within
the unit in order to observe hand hygiene practices. Number of times hands
were actually washed was compared to the total opportunities to wash
hands. After the initial data was collected, the hospital's infection
control nurses provided an educational program on hand hygiene for the
staff. The graduate student will then repeat the blind staff observations.
Hand hygiene compliance prior to the educational program will be compared
with data collected after the educational program was conducted. The
findings will demonstrate the effectiveness of hand hygiene education and
the availability of hand sanitizing agents for compliance to hand hygiene
standards. References Pajares, F. (2002). Overview of social cognitive
theory and of self-efficacy. Available at http://www.emory.edu/EDUCATION/mfp/eff.html.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHand Hygiene in Critical Care Areasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161232-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hand Hygiene in Critical Care Areas</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sullivan, Erin, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 3110 Vine St., Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(513) 558-5234</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mosiedotes@earthlink.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Francine Kidd, BSN, RN; Rebeckah Williams, RN; and Kyra Whitmer, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem/Purpose&ugrave;Appropriate hand hygiene has been identified as a key <br/> component in preventing the spread of infections. The CDC recently <br/> published new hand hygiene guidelines. JCAHO&AElig;s Patient Safety Goal #7 also <br/> addressed hand hygiene. As part of this goal, hospitals must provide data <br/> on appropriate staff utilization of hand hygiene. This study was designed <br/> to provide a level I trauma center with data on hand hygiene compliance <br/> within their critical care areas as well as helping to identify personnel <br/> in need of additional focused education on hand hygiene. <br/> Methods/Findings&ugrave;Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory was used to design this <br/> study. This theory proposes a reciprocal relationship between <br/> environmental factors, personal factors (i.e. cognitive processes), and <br/> behaviors. A blind observation of hand hygiene practices was conducted. <br/> Staff was informed a graduate student would be on the unit to observe <br/> &quot;traffic patterns&quot;. All staff members within the unit were subject to <br/> observation; no individual identifiers were collected. The student was <br/> present during 6-hour blocks over 4 days so that all shifts were <br/> represented. The student was positioned in a centralized location within <br/> the unit in order to observe hand hygiene practices. Number of times hands <br/> were actually washed was compared to the total opportunities to wash <br/> hands. After the initial data was collected, the hospital's infection <br/> control nurses provided an educational program on hand hygiene for the <br/> staff. The graduate student will then repeat the blind staff observations. <br/> Hand hygiene compliance prior to the educational program will be compared <br/> with data collected after the educational program was conducted. The <br/> findings will demonstrate the effectiveness of hand hygiene education and <br/> the availability of hand sanitizing agents for compliance to hand hygiene <br/> standards. References Pajares, F. (2002). Overview of social cognitive <br/> theory and of self-efficacy. Available at http://www.emory.edu/EDUCATION/mfp/eff.html.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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