Living, Dying, and Personhood: An End-of-Life Continuing Nursing Education Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161234
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Living, Dying, and Personhood: An End-of-Life Continuing Nursing Education Program
Abstract:
Living, Dying, and Personhood: An End-of-Life Continuing Nursing Education Program
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Tadel, Patrice
P.I. Institution Name:Lewis University
Contact Address:College of Nursing and Health Professions, One University Parkway, Romeoville, IL, 60442, USA
Contact Telephone:630.776.2221
This project was designed to explore the effectiveness of a continuing nursing education workshop in promoting the knowledge base, confidence, and comfort level of nurses with various levels of experience in caring for patients at end of life. Literature findings supported the inadequacy and importance of nursing education for end-of-life care. Using an interventional program evaluation design, a small sample (n=18) of practicing nurses and nursing students participated in a two-day workshop exploring issues and experiences surrounding end-of-life. A survey tool adapted with permission was given as a pre-test and post-test for this continuing education intervention. Kolb's Experiential Learning Theory (1984) and Knowles Theory of Self-directed Learning (1975) were the theoretical frameworks for this project. Teaching strategies focused on participants' experiences, reflection on experiences, and individual learning, enhanced with group discussion and problem-solving. Since KnowlesÆ theory recognizes the value of student insight in the teaching-learning process, specific teaching strategies were used to facilitate self-discovery, self-identification of emotional responses to terminal illness and death, reflection on existing clinical skills, and identification of skills for future clinical application related to death and dying. Specific learning activities for cultural competence reflected Leininger's (1985) visual inquiry method in which participants reflected on and analyzed healthcare behaviors and identified social action steps within their healthcare settings. Teaching strategies had the purpose of allowing participants to record and share individual experiences, fears related to difficult situations and the opportunity to use critical thinking to evaluate individual responses to a variety of situations presenting at end of life. Outcomes will be evaluated by reviewing course evaluations and analyzing data from the survey using chi-square to explore for differences between the pre-test and post-test results. It is hoped this study will form the foundation for enhancing end of life education for professional and student nurses. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLiving, Dying, and Personhood: An End-of-Life Continuing Nursing Education Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161234-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Living, Dying, and Personhood: An End-of-Life Continuing Nursing Education Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tadel, Patrice</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lewis University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing and Health Professions, One University Parkway, Romeoville, IL, 60442, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">630.776.2221</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rnchpnethics@sbcglobal.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This project was designed to explore the effectiveness of a continuing nursing education workshop in promoting the knowledge base, confidence, and comfort level of nurses with various levels of experience in caring for patients at end of life. Literature findings supported the inadequacy and importance of nursing education for end-of-life care. Using an interventional program evaluation design, a small sample (n=18) of practicing nurses and nursing students participated in a two-day workshop exploring issues and experiences surrounding end-of-life. A survey tool adapted with permission was given as a pre-test and post-test for this continuing education intervention. Kolb's Experiential Learning Theory (1984) and Knowles Theory of Self-directed Learning (1975) were the theoretical frameworks for this project. Teaching strategies focused on participants' experiences, reflection on experiences, and individual learning, enhanced with group discussion and problem-solving. Since Knowles&AElig; theory recognizes the value of student insight in the teaching-learning process, specific teaching strategies were used to facilitate self-discovery, self-identification of emotional responses to terminal illness and death, reflection on existing clinical skills, and identification of skills for future clinical application related to death and dying. Specific learning activities for cultural competence reflected Leininger's (1985) visual inquiry method in which participants reflected on and analyzed healthcare behaviors and identified social action steps within their healthcare settings. Teaching strategies had the purpose of allowing participants to record and share individual experiences, fears related to difficult situations and the opportunity to use critical thinking to evaluate individual responses to a variety of situations presenting at end of life. Outcomes will be evaluated by reviewing course evaluations and analyzing data from the survey using chi-square to explore for differences between the pre-test and post-test results. It is hoped this study will form the foundation for enhancing end of life education for professional and student nurses. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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