Adapting an empirically validated parent training program for training child and adolescent psychiatric nurses in effective child management strategies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161236
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adapting an empirically validated parent training program for training child and adolescent psychiatric nurses in effective child management strategies
Abstract:
Adapting an empirically validated parent training program for training child and adolescent psychiatric nurses in effective child management strategies
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Tucker, Sharon, DNSc, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Mayo Clinic
Title:Clinical Nurse Researcher
Contact Address:Nursing Research Division, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA
Contact Telephone:507-255-7859
Co-Authors:Sue M. Odegarden, MS, RN, Manager; and Della J. Derscheid, MS, CNS, Clinical Nurse Specialist
Background: Substantial evidence from randomized clinical trials
supports the benefits of early intervention/prevention for children and
families. Translating these findings into practice settings is widely
recommended, however the process of adapting evidence-based interventions
to fit specific settings and populations is understudied.
Purpose: This evaluation designed pilot study examined the feasibility,
acceptability and effects of adapting an empirically validated
parent/teacher training program for training registered nurses from a
midwestern child/adolescent inpatient psychiatric unit (CAIPU) in
effective child management strategies.
Method: 12 registered nurses from the CAIPU participated in a 3-day
standardized parent training workshop. 15 nurses from the CAIPU who did
not receive the training served as comparison participants. Baseline and
post-training data were collected on participant-reported confidence and
strategies for working with children and parents. Child management skills
were independently coded from videotaped nurse-child play sessions.
Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to evaluate training
effects. Narrative comments were summarized.
Results: Preliminary analyses indicate significant improvements (p < .05)
in self-reported use of effective strategies for working with parents and
confidence in skills for working with parents and children. Nurses who
received training reported greater (p=.01) frequency in use of recommended
child management strategies. Participant satisfaction was high. Program
training aspects identified as most effective were therapist
discussion/teaching, videotaped parent-child vignettes, role plays and
group discussion/interaction. Observation and narrative data are under
analysis.
Conclusions: Adoption of an evidence-based parent training program for
training child and adolescent psychiatric nurses was feasible, effective
and holds promise for improving nursing strategies/skills for working with
children and parents.
Implications: Further study on the training process and child and family
outcomes of adopting this empirically validated program for nurses and
other providers in a variety of settings is recommended. Investigation of
the adoption process may illucidate effective strategies for translating
other evidence-based interventions into practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdapting an empirically validated parent training program for training child and adolescent psychiatric nurses in effective child management strategiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161236-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adapting an empirically validated parent training program for training child and adolescent psychiatric nurses in effective child management strategies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tucker, Sharon, DNSc, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mayo Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Researcher</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Research Division, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507-255-7859</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tucker.sharon@mayo.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sue M. Odegarden, MS, RN, Manager; and Della J. Derscheid, MS, CNS, Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Substantial evidence from randomized clinical trials <br/> supports the benefits of early intervention/prevention for children and <br/> families. Translating these findings into practice settings is widely <br/> recommended, however the process of adapting evidence-based interventions <br/> to fit specific settings and populations is understudied. <br/> Purpose: This evaluation designed pilot study examined the feasibility, <br/> acceptability and effects of adapting an empirically validated <br/> parent/teacher training program for training registered nurses from a <br/> midwestern child/adolescent inpatient psychiatric unit (CAIPU) in <br/> effective child management strategies. <br/> Method: 12 registered nurses from the CAIPU participated in a 3-day <br/> standardized parent training workshop. 15 nurses from the CAIPU who did <br/> not receive the training served as comparison participants. Baseline and <br/> post-training data were collected on participant-reported confidence and <br/> strategies for working with children and parents. Child management skills <br/> were independently coded from videotaped nurse-child play sessions. <br/> Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to evaluate training <br/> effects. Narrative comments were summarized. <br/> Results: Preliminary analyses indicate significant improvements (p &lt; .05) <br/> in self-reported use of effective strategies for working with parents and <br/> confidence in skills for working with parents and children. Nurses who <br/> received training reported greater (p=.01) frequency in use of recommended <br/> child management strategies. Participant satisfaction was high. Program <br/> training aspects identified as most effective were therapist <br/> discussion/teaching, videotaped parent-child vignettes, role plays and <br/> group discussion/interaction. Observation and narrative data are under <br/> analysis.<br/> Conclusions: Adoption of an evidence-based parent training program for <br/> training child and adolescent psychiatric nurses was feasible, effective <br/> and holds promise for improving nursing strategies/skills for working with <br/> children and parents. <br/> Implications: Further study on the training process and child and family <br/> outcomes of adopting this empirically validated program for nurses and <br/> other providers in a variety of settings is recommended. Investigation of <br/> the adoption process may illucidate effective strategies for translating <br/> other evidence-based interventions into practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.