Qualitative Evaluation of Hypnotically Suggested Analgesia: A Non-Pharmacologic Nursing Pain Management Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161239
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Qualitative Evaluation of Hypnotically Suggested Analgesia: A Non-Pharmacologic Nursing Pain Management Intervention
Abstract:
Qualitative Evaluation of Hypnotically Suggested Analgesia: A Non-Pharmacologic Nursing Pain Management Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Van Wormer, Georgia, DNS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University-Calumet
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 2200 169th Street, Hammond, IN, 46323-2494, USA
Contact Telephone:219-989-2831
Co-Authors:Susan M. Rawl, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor and Juanita F. Keck, DNS, RN, Professor
Purpose: To investigate the effect of hypnosis and visual imagery on
experimental pain among a convenience sample of adults in the community.
Background: Despite two decades of intense pain research traditional pain
management continues to rely primarily on pharmaceuticals for pain relief.
Unfortunately, pain medication regimes are not totally effective in
relieving pain. Cognitive interventions such as hypnosis and visual
imagery are not currently utilized by nursing in pain management.
Methodology: Twelve subjects (age 27-60) were recruited from the business
community. The first trial, the control condition, involved the production
of pain with no intervention, followed by a trial of pain and visual
imagery with standardized verbal suggestions for pain relief. During the
third trial a hypnotic induction was provided with standardized verbal
suggestions for pain relief. Hypnotic susceptibility was measured using
the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C. Pain was produced via
the sub-maximal tourniquet test for no longer than 20 minutes. Pain
intensity and pain distress were measured by self-report using an 11-point
scale. Tolerance for the pain experience was measured by cuff time.
Results: Pain intensity and pain distress were significantly reduced
following both the visual imagery and hypnosis sessions. Tolerance for the
pain experience was significantly longer for the hypnosis trial (8.29
minutes for the control, extended to 17.33 minutes with hypnosis). Power
ranged from .92 to .98 indicating the sample was large enough to identify
significant differences. Effect sizes measured at eta2 ranged from .71 to
.75. Implications: Results of this support that hypnosis can be an
effective non-pharmacologic nursing pain management intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQualitative Evaluation of Hypnotically Suggested Analgesia: A Non-Pharmacologic Nursing Pain Management Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161239-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Qualitative Evaluation of Hypnotically Suggested Analgesia: A Non-Pharmacologic Nursing Pain Management Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Van Wormer, Georgia, DNS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University-Calumet</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 2200 169th Street, Hammond, IN, 46323-2494, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">219-989-2831</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gvwormer@calumet.purdue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan M. Rawl, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor and Juanita F. Keck, DNS, RN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To investigate the effect of hypnosis and visual imagery on <br/> experimental pain among a convenience sample of adults in the community. <br/> Background: Despite two decades of intense pain research traditional pain <br/> management continues to rely primarily on pharmaceuticals for pain relief. <br/> Unfortunately, pain medication regimes are not totally effective in <br/> relieving pain. Cognitive interventions such as hypnosis and visual <br/> imagery are not currently utilized by nursing in pain management. <br/> Methodology: Twelve subjects (age 27-60) were recruited from the business <br/> community. The first trial, the control condition, involved the production <br/> of pain with no intervention, followed by a trial of pain and visual <br/> imagery with standardized verbal suggestions for pain relief. During the <br/> third trial a hypnotic induction was provided with standardized verbal <br/> suggestions for pain relief. Hypnotic susceptibility was measured using <br/> the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C. Pain was produced via <br/> the sub-maximal tourniquet test for no longer than 20 minutes. Pain <br/> intensity and pain distress were measured by self-report using an 11-point <br/> scale. Tolerance for the pain experience was measured by cuff time. <br/> Results: Pain intensity and pain distress were significantly reduced <br/> following both the visual imagery and hypnosis sessions. Tolerance for the <br/> pain experience was significantly longer for the hypnosis trial (8.29 <br/> minutes for the control, extended to 17.33 minutes with hypnosis). Power <br/> ranged from .92 to .98 indicating the sample was large enough to identify <br/> significant differences. Effect sizes measured at eta2 ranged from .71 to <br/> .75. Implications: Results of this support that hypnosis can be an <br/> effective non-pharmacologic nursing pain management intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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