Planning and Implementing Wellness Education: Health Promotion Program for Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161241
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Planning and Implementing Wellness Education: Health Promotion Program for Older Adults
Abstract:
Planning and Implementing Wellness Education: Health Promotion Program for Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Vithayachockitikhun, Niranart, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-2000
A wellness education program was developed to enhance physical and
mental health behaviors in older adults living in a congregate senior
living community in the Midwest. The project was planned and implemented
by a graduate nursing student. The survey used Pender's health promotion
model to assess the health needs of the elderly. Wellness education
sessions were developed according to their health needs. The first
wellness education was focused on depression and stress management. The
average score of the Geriatric Depression Scale (short version) of 15
older adults was 8.1 suggesting that they had probable depression. The
average score on the Vulnerability to Stress Scale was 27.7 indicating
that they had little vulnerability to stress. The participants had an
opportunity to discuss their problems and express their emotions. The
second session was focused on healthy eating and weight control including
the Food Pyramid Bingo game aimed at the importance of eating a variety of
foods. The average Body Mass Index of eight participants was 24.9. The
third session focused on falls prevention. Eighteen participants were
given a fall-prevention checklist to identify the hazards in their
apartments before the class began. Participants were informed about their
risk for falls and strategies to prevent them. Tai chi exercise, to
improve balance and coordination was also taught at the apartment. One of
the participants said that she would change her life style and practice
such things as not getting up too quickly after lying down and always
using a walker to maintain her balance.
Results of the elder wellness education program evaluation suggest that
participants had increased knowledge about healthy eating, strategies to
deal with depression and stress as well as how to decrease falls. The
clinical specialist in community health nursing can implement the programs
to promote health and well-being in these populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePlanning and Implementing Wellness Education: Health Promotion Program for Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161241-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Planning and Implementing Wellness Education: Health Promotion Program for Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vithayachockitikhun, Niranart, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-2000</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nxv15@case.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A wellness education program was developed to enhance physical and <br/> mental health behaviors in older adults living in a congregate senior <br/> living community in the Midwest. The project was planned and implemented <br/> by a graduate nursing student. The survey used Pender's health promotion <br/> model to assess the health needs of the elderly. Wellness education <br/> sessions were developed according to their health needs. The first <br/> wellness education was focused on depression and stress management. The <br/> average score of the Geriatric Depression Scale (short version) of 15 <br/> older adults was 8.1 suggesting that they had probable depression. The <br/> average score on the Vulnerability to Stress Scale was 27.7 indicating <br/> that they had little vulnerability to stress. The participants had an <br/> opportunity to discuss their problems and express their emotions. The <br/> second session was focused on healthy eating and weight control including <br/> the Food Pyramid Bingo game aimed at the importance of eating a variety of <br/> foods. The average Body Mass Index of eight participants was 24.9. The <br/> third session focused on falls prevention. Eighteen participants were <br/> given a fall-prevention checklist to identify the hazards in their <br/> apartments before the class began. Participants were informed about their <br/> risk for falls and strategies to prevent them. Tai chi exercise, to <br/> improve balance and coordination was also taught at the apartment. One of <br/> the participants said that she would change her life style and practice <br/> such things as not getting up too quickly after lying down and always <br/> using a walker to maintain her balance.<br/> Results of the elder wellness education program evaluation suggest that <br/> participants had increased knowledge about healthy eating, strategies to <br/> deal with depression and stress as well as how to decrease falls. The <br/> clinical specialist in community health nursing can implement the programs <br/> to promote health and well-being in these populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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