2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161244
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeeding
Abstract:
Motivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeeding
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Wilhelm, Susan, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Childbearing Research, 4502 Avenue I, Scottsbluff, NE, 69361, USA
Contact Telephone:308-632-0426
Co-Authors:Mary Beth Flanders Stepans, PhD, RN, Associate Professor and T. Kim Rodehorst, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor
Breastfeeding provides the ideal infant food and is the first step in
preventing many chronic conditions. Yet less than 32% receive this food
for the recommended first 6 months of life (Ryan, 2002). The Healthy
People 2010 goal of 50% breastfeeding for six months is not being met
(USDHHS, 2000). Innovative holistic interventions are needed to promote
sustained breastfeeding. This pilot study explored the feasibility of
using motivational interviewing [MI], a client centered strategy to
promote sustained breastfeeding. MI was compared to usual care to
determine if mothers reported greater self-efficacy to breastfeed, greater
intention to sustain breastfeeding, and then, sustained breastfeeding
longer than mothers who received usual care. Sustained breastfeeding was
validated by biomarkers, oligosaccharides in infant feces and infant test
weights. Seventy-six primiparous breastfeeding mothers recruited from a
Midwest rural area were randomly assigned to intervention group and
followed for 6 months. Oligosaccharides and infant test weights validated
breastfeeding behavior. There was a positive relationship between
intention to sustain breastfeeding (at day two after birth) and duration
of breastfeeding (r=.287; p=.020) as well as self-efficacy (at two weeks)
and duration of breastfeeding (r=.285; p=.033). There was no difference
between the MI intervention and usual care group in self-efficacy for
breastfeeding (t=1.6, p=.109). Survival analysis showed that women in the
MI group did sustain breastfeeding longer than women in the usual care
group (median days of 115 versus 59), but differences between the survival
curves were not significant.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeedingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161244-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motivational Interviewing to Promote Sustained Breastfeeding</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilhelm, Susan, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Childbearing Research, 4502 Avenue I, Scottsbluff, NE, 69361, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">308-632-0426</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">slwihel@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Beth Flanders Stepans, PhD, RN, Associate Professor and T. Kim Rodehorst, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Breastfeeding provides the ideal infant food and is the first step in <br/> preventing many chronic conditions. Yet less than 32% receive this food <br/> for the recommended first 6 months of life (Ryan, 2002). The Healthy <br/> People 2010 goal of 50% breastfeeding for six months is not being met <br/> (USDHHS, 2000). Innovative holistic interventions are needed to promote <br/> sustained breastfeeding. This pilot study explored the feasibility of <br/> using motivational interviewing [MI], a client centered strategy to <br/> promote sustained breastfeeding. MI was compared to usual care to <br/> determine if mothers reported greater self-efficacy to breastfeed, greater <br/> intention to sustain breastfeeding, and then, sustained breastfeeding <br/> longer than mothers who received usual care. Sustained breastfeeding was <br/> validated by biomarkers, oligosaccharides in infant feces and infant test <br/> weights. Seventy-six primiparous breastfeeding mothers recruited from a <br/> Midwest rural area were randomly assigned to intervention group and <br/> followed for 6 months. Oligosaccharides and infant test weights validated <br/> breastfeeding behavior. There was a positive relationship between <br/> intention to sustain breastfeeding (at day two after birth) and duration <br/> of breastfeeding (r=.287; p=.020) as well as self-efficacy (at two weeks) <br/> and duration of breastfeeding (r=.285; p=.033). There was no difference <br/> between the MI intervention and usual care group in self-efficacy for <br/> breastfeeding (t=1.6, p=.109). Survival analysis showed that women in the <br/> MI group did sustain breastfeeding longer than women in the usual care <br/> group (median days of 115 versus 59), but differences between the survival <br/> curves were not significant.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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