2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161245
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Obesity in the Chronically Critically Ill: Characteristics and Outcomes
Abstract:
Obesity in the Chronically Critically Ill: Characteristics and Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Winkelman, Chris, PhD, CNP, CCRN -Study Contact
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368-0700
Co-Authors:Patricia A. Higgins, PhD, MSN, BSN, Assistant Professor and Principal Investigator; Nutthita Petchprapai, RN, MSN, Research Assistant; Su-Er Guo, MSN, RN, Research Assistant; and Amy R. Lipson, PhD, Project Director
Problem: Little is known about obese patients who have a prolonged
intensive care unit (ICU) hospitalization. Purpose: This study uses an
outcomes framework to describe the characteristics and outcomes of
patients with a body mass index (BMI) - 30 kg/m2 from an urban, teaching
hospital who experienced an ICU stay of 3 or more days. Methods: This is a
secondary analysis of data from a larger descriptive study that examined
adult failure to thrive in 400 patients experiencing a minimum of 3 days
of mechanical ventilation. Results: 132 chronically critically ill obese
patients were enrolled. 86 (65%) were female; 77 (58%) were Caucasian; and
the average age was 60 years. 52 (40%) were admitted with a primary
cardiorespiratory diagnosis. The mean APACHE 3 score was 77.5 for the
entire sample. Nearly all subjects (99%) had at least one pre-existing
condition (median number of conditions=6). The average BMI was 38.7 kg/m2.
Subjects were mechanically ventilated for a mean of 12 days, with a mean
ICU stay of 17 days and hospital length of stay of 25 days. 97(74%) of
subjects were ultimately returned to spontaneous ventilation. 35 subjects
(27%) died during hospitalization. Regression analysis indicates that 20%
of mortality is explained by age and pre-existing congestive heart failure
(beta 1.035 and 3.577, respectively, p < 0.05). Subjects in the parent
study with a BMI < 30kg/m2 had a higher mortality rate than obese subjects
(chi=8.497, p=0.04). Conclusions: This sample is younger, more likely to
be female and be admitted with a higher acuity of illness than the
ôtypicalö ICU population. Compared to other chronically critically ill
patients in the parent study and other reports, obese chronically
critically ill patients appear to have a slightly longer duration of
mechanical ventilation and length of stay but increased survivability.
Acknowledgements: Funded by the NINR (R01NR05005), Patricia Higgins,
Principle Investigator.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleObesity in the Chronically Critically Ill: Characteristics and Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161245-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Obesity in the Chronically Critically Ill: Characteristics and Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Winkelman, Chris, PhD, CNP, CCRN -Study Contact</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368-0700</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chris.winkelman@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia A. Higgins, PhD, MSN, BSN, Assistant Professor and Principal Investigator; Nutthita Petchprapai, RN, MSN, Research Assistant; Su-Er Guo, MSN, RN, Research Assistant; and Amy R. Lipson, PhD, Project Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Little is known about obese patients who have a prolonged <br/> intensive care unit (ICU) hospitalization. Purpose: This study uses an <br/> outcomes framework to describe the characteristics and outcomes of <br/> patients with a body mass index (BMI) - 30 kg/m2 from an urban, teaching <br/> hospital who experienced an ICU stay of 3 or more days. Methods: This is a <br/> secondary analysis of data from a larger descriptive study that examined <br/> adult failure to thrive in 400 patients experiencing a minimum of 3 days <br/> of mechanical ventilation. Results: 132 chronically critically ill obese <br/> patients were enrolled. 86 (65%) were female; 77 (58%) were Caucasian; and <br/> the average age was 60 years. 52 (40%) were admitted with a primary <br/> cardiorespiratory diagnosis. The mean APACHE 3 score was 77.5 for the <br/> entire sample. Nearly all subjects (99%) had at least one pre-existing <br/> condition (median number of conditions=6). The average BMI was 38.7 kg/m2. <br/> Subjects were mechanically ventilated for a mean of 12 days, with a mean <br/> ICU stay of 17 days and hospital length of stay of 25 days. 97(74%) of <br/> subjects were ultimately returned to spontaneous ventilation. 35 subjects <br/> (27%) died during hospitalization. Regression analysis indicates that 20% <br/> of mortality is explained by age and pre-existing congestive heart failure <br/> (beta 1.035 and 3.577, respectively, p &lt; 0.05). Subjects in the parent <br/> study with a BMI &lt; 30kg/m2 had a higher mortality rate than obese subjects <br/> (chi=8.497, p=0.04). Conclusions: This sample is younger, more likely to <br/> be female and be admitted with a higher acuity of illness than the <br/> &ocirc;typical&ouml; ICU population. Compared to other chronically critically ill <br/> patients in the parent study and other reports, obese chronically <br/> critically ill patients appear to have a slightly longer duration of <br/> mechanical ventilation and length of stay but increased survivability. <br/> Acknowledgements: Funded by the NINR (R01NR05005), Patricia Higgins, <br/> Principle Investigator.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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