Effects of Timing and Frequency of Relaxing Music Interventions During Acute Recovery from Acute Myocardial Infarction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161246
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Timing and Frequency of Relaxing Music Interventions During Acute Recovery from Acute Myocardial Infarction
Abstract:
Effects of Timing and Frequency of Relaxing Music Interventions During Acute Recovery from Acute Myocardial Infarction
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Winters, Jill, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA
Contact Telephone:(414) 288-3848
Co-Authors:Susan Cashin, PhD, Lecturer
Problem: Each year, 1.1 million Americans experience acute myocardial
infarction (AMI). Diminished heart rate variability (HRV) is an important
predictor of morbidity and mortality in this population. Another major
determinant of negative outcomes is the extent of myocardial damage, which
is influenced by factors impacting myocardial oxygen (MVO2) supply and
demand. Previous research has shown that relaxing music reduces anxiety,
improves MVO2 supply-to-demand ratios and increases HRV. Intervention
issues including frequency and optimal time of day for music have not been
tested. Therefore, the purpose of this randomized six-group experimental
design study was to compare effectiveness of relaxing music, rest, and
treatment as usual, for improving indicators of cardiac autonomic nervous
system function and reducing anxiety. Conceptual Framework: The conceptual
framework guiding this study is based on the premise that if music can
elicit a relaxation response, the stress response will be broken. Methods:
The six comparison groups were (1) music once per day (morning); (2 & 3)
music twice per day (morning & afternoon; morning & evening); (4) music
three times per day (morning, afternoon, & evening); (5) attention (quiet
rest); and (6) control (usual treatment). Dependent variables included
heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, MVO2 demand (rate pressure
product), HRV, and state anxiety. Results: One hundred eighty individuals
who experienced AMI during the previous 72 hours participated. Analysis of
variance was used to compare change scores of dependent variables. Tukey's
post hoc tests revealed significant improvements for all dependent
variables in music group participants at each intervention time.
Conclusion: Relaxing music sessions promote a relaxation response during
recovery from AMI, thereby reducing MVO2 demand and potentially reducing
the extent of myocardial injury and damage and improving measures of HRV.
Recommendations for implementing relaxing music sessions will be
presented. This study was funded in part by NINR 5R01NR005004-06.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Timing and Frequency of Relaxing Music Interventions During Acute Recovery from Acute Myocardial Infarctionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161246-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Timing and Frequency of Relaxing Music Interventions During Acute Recovery from Acute Myocardial Infarction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Winters, Jill, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(414) 288-3848</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jill.winters@marquette.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Cashin, PhD, Lecturer</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Each year, 1.1 million Americans experience acute myocardial <br/> infarction (AMI). Diminished heart rate variability (HRV) is an important <br/> predictor of morbidity and mortality in this population. Another major <br/> determinant of negative outcomes is the extent of myocardial damage, which <br/> is influenced by factors impacting myocardial oxygen (MVO2) supply and <br/> demand. Previous research has shown that relaxing music reduces anxiety, <br/> improves MVO2 supply-to-demand ratios and increases HRV. Intervention <br/> issues including frequency and optimal time of day for music have not been <br/> tested. Therefore, the purpose of this randomized six-group experimental <br/> design study was to compare effectiveness of relaxing music, rest, and <br/> treatment as usual, for improving indicators of cardiac autonomic nervous <br/> system function and reducing anxiety. Conceptual Framework: The conceptual <br/> framework guiding this study is based on the premise that if music can <br/> elicit a relaxation response, the stress response will be broken. Methods: <br/> The six comparison groups were (1) music once per day (morning); (2 &amp; 3) <br/> music twice per day (morning &amp; afternoon; morning &amp; evening); (4) music <br/> three times per day (morning, afternoon, &amp; evening); (5) attention (quiet <br/> rest); and (6) control (usual treatment). Dependent variables included <br/> heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, MVO2 demand (rate pressure <br/> product), HRV, and state anxiety. Results: One hundred eighty individuals <br/> who experienced AMI during the previous 72 hours participated. Analysis of <br/> variance was used to compare change scores of dependent variables. Tukey's <br/> post hoc tests revealed significant improvements for all dependent <br/> variables in music group participants at each intervention time. <br/> Conclusion: Relaxing music sessions promote a relaxation response during <br/> recovery from AMI, thereby reducing MVO2 demand and potentially reducing <br/> the extent of myocardial injury and damage and improving measures of HRV. <br/> Recommendations for implementing relaxing music sessions will be <br/> presented. This study was funded in part by NINR 5R01NR005004-06.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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