Effects of Teaching Resourcefulness and Acceptance on Affect, Behavior, and Cognition of Chronically Ill Elders

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161248
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Teaching Resourcefulness and Acceptance on Affect, Behavior, and Cognition of Chronically Ill Elders
Abstract:
Effects of Teaching Resourcefulness and Acceptance on Affect, Behavior, and Cognition of Chronically Ill Elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD, RN, C
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Dean
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-3612
Co-Authors:Patricia E .McDonald, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Carol M Musil, PhD, Associate Professor; Laura DeHelian, PhD, APRN, BC, Lecturer; Noreen Brady, PhD, APN, LPCC, Assistant Professor; Unchalee Vealadee, BS, Predoctoral Student; Chien-Yu Lai, MSN, RN, Pr
As elders live longer, they are increasingly vulnerable to chronic
illness and age-related neurophysiologic changes that impair their ability
to function independently, Acceptance of these changes is difficult as
elders strive to maintain independence; their resourcefulness is
challenged while their daily functioning is compromised. Purpose: This
study examined changes in the affective, behavioral, and cognitive
dimensions (ABC) of personal functioning that are associated with chronic
illness in older adults. Theoretical framework: HornbyÆs (1990) theory of
human functioning and personal change views ABC as interrelated dimensions
with changes in one dimension influencing the others. Subjects: This
clinical trial involved 176 chronically ill elders who were housed in one
of 17 Northeast Ohio retirement communities that were randomly assigned to
one of three treatment conditions. Methods: Elders participated in six
2-hour weekly group sessions of Resourcefulness Training (RT), Acceptance
Training (AT), or Diversional Activities (DA). All elders within a single
retirement community received the same treatment. Negative emotions,
depressive cognitions, and functional behaviors were measured
pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, and at 6- and 12-weeks.
Measures included the Emotional Symptom Checklist (Zauszniewski, 2002) for
affect, the Health Assessment Questionnaire (Fries, 1996) for behavior,
and the Depressive Cognition Scale (Zauszniewski, 1995) for cognition.
Results: In the total sample and treatment subgroups, measures of affect,
behavior, and cognition were correlated significantly. The RT group
improved immediately on affect (t=4.91; p<.001) and cognition (t=2.03;
p<.05); these effects lasted 12-weeks. The AT group improved immediately
on affect (t=3.08; p<.01); but this effect did not persist. The RT and AT
groups had positive behavior changes at 6- and 12-weeks. The DA group had
no positive changes in ABC. Conclusion: The findings suggest that teaching
elders resourcefulness and acceptance of their chronic conditions may
successfully promote their healthy functioning and lead to personal
changes that enrich their quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Teaching Resourcefulness and Acceptance on Affect, Behavior, and Cognition of Chronically Ill Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161248-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Teaching Resourcefulness and Acceptance on Affect, Behavior, and Cognition of Chronically Ill Elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD, RN, C</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-3612</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jaz@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia E .McDonald, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Carol M Musil, PhD, Associate Professor; Laura DeHelian, PhD, APRN, BC, Lecturer; Noreen Brady, PhD, APN, LPCC, Assistant Professor; Unchalee Vealadee, BS, Predoctoral Student; Chien-Yu Lai, MSN, RN, Pr</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As elders live longer, they are increasingly vulnerable to chronic <br/> illness and age-related neurophysiologic changes that impair their ability <br/> to function independently, Acceptance of these changes is difficult as <br/> elders strive to maintain independence; their resourcefulness is <br/> challenged while their daily functioning is compromised. Purpose: This <br/> study examined changes in the affective, behavioral, and cognitive <br/> dimensions (ABC) of personal functioning that are associated with chronic <br/> illness in older adults. Theoretical framework: Hornby&AElig;s (1990) theory of <br/> human functioning and personal change views ABC as interrelated dimensions <br/> with changes in one dimension influencing the others. Subjects: This <br/> clinical trial involved 176 chronically ill elders who were housed in one <br/> of 17 Northeast Ohio retirement communities that were randomly assigned to <br/> one of three treatment conditions. Methods: Elders participated in six <br/> 2-hour weekly group sessions of Resourcefulness Training (RT), Acceptance <br/> Training (AT), or Diversional Activities (DA). All elders within a single <br/> retirement community received the same treatment. Negative emotions, <br/> depressive cognitions, and functional behaviors were measured <br/> pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, and at 6- and 12-weeks. <br/> Measures included the Emotional Symptom Checklist (Zauszniewski, 2002) for <br/> affect, the Health Assessment Questionnaire (Fries, 1996) for behavior, <br/> and the Depressive Cognition Scale (Zauszniewski, 1995) for cognition. <br/> Results: In the total sample and treatment subgroups, measures of affect, <br/> behavior, and cognition were correlated significantly. The RT group <br/> improved immediately on affect (t=4.91; p&lt;.001) and cognition (t=2.03; <br/> p&lt;.05); these effects lasted 12-weeks. The AT group improved immediately <br/> on affect (t=3.08; p&lt;.01); but this effect did not persist. The RT and AT <br/> groups had positive behavior changes at 6- and 12-weeks. The DA group had <br/> no positive changes in ABC. Conclusion: The findings suggest that teaching <br/> elders resourcefulness and acceptance of their chronic conditions may <br/> successfully promote their healthy functioning and lead to personal <br/> changes that enrich their quality of life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.