2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161251
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hispanics in the Hollers: Community Capacity and Diabetes
Abstract:
Hispanics in the Hollers: Community Capacity and Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Anderson, Mary Kay, MSN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Creighton University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE, 68178, USA
Co-Authors:K. Rayman, Professional Roles & Mental Health Nursing, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN
In 2003, La Coalicion Hispano-Americana de la Salud (CHAS) was initiated by researchers from East Tennessee State University (ETSU) and representatives from the Hispanic community. Utilizing CDC funds, the members of CHAS and ETSU faculty engaged in community-based participatory research (CBPR) with goals to increase community capacity for health and reduce the burden of diabetes for the Hispanic community. Success of community interventions is generally measured by reductions in morbidity and mortality. While not entirely rejecting traditional aggregate approaches to community health, another paradigm has emerged that focuses on the community as the client and acknowledges that social, political, and economic conditions beyond individual control contribute to health. This report presents some of the results of efforts to examine one community approach to health in Appalachia. In the course of the overall research effort, an extensive house to house survey was undertaken by trained community representatives to measure community capacity. Community members took part in the survey design, testing, and implementation, as well as interpretation of results. The Community Competence Assessment Survey was implemented early in the research process and again two years later. Over 450 households were represented in each survey. The survey process, the survey instrument, and survey results are discussed in this report. Briefly, the Hispanic community in East Tennessee perceives itself as mid-range in the scope of community competence. Although patterns of responses were strikingly similar in the two surveys, the total index was significantly lower in the second. Highest rated items related to commitment to the community, and the least favorable reflected perceptions of racism in the larger community. Among the eight dimensions of community competence, social support, participation, communication, machinery for decision-making, and management of relations with larger society all had significantly lower scores in the second survey. The results of this study will aid in the delivery of culturally-appropriate health promotion and preventive care to Hispanic Appalachians and will expand the community's capacity to address the issue of diabetes through health advocacy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHispanics in the Hollers: Community Capacity and Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161251-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hispanics in the Hollers: Community Capacity and Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Mary Kay, MSN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Creighton University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE, 68178, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marykayanderson@creighton.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Rayman, Professional Roles &amp; Mental Health Nursing, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In 2003, La Coalicion Hispano-Americana de la Salud (CHAS) was initiated by researchers from East Tennessee State University (ETSU) and representatives from the Hispanic community. Utilizing CDC funds, the members of CHAS and ETSU faculty engaged in community-based participatory research (CBPR) with goals to increase community capacity for health and reduce the burden of diabetes for the Hispanic community. Success of community interventions is generally measured by reductions in morbidity and mortality. While not entirely rejecting traditional aggregate approaches to community health, another paradigm has emerged that focuses on the community as the client and acknowledges that social, political, and economic conditions beyond individual control contribute to health. This report presents some of the results of efforts to examine one community approach to health in Appalachia. In the course of the overall research effort, an extensive house to house survey was undertaken by trained community representatives to measure community capacity. Community members took part in the survey design, testing, and implementation, as well as interpretation of results. The Community Competence Assessment Survey was implemented early in the research process and again two years later. Over 450 households were represented in each survey. The survey process, the survey instrument, and survey results are discussed in this report. Briefly, the Hispanic community in East Tennessee perceives itself as mid-range in the scope of community competence. Although patterns of responses were strikingly similar in the two surveys, the total index was significantly lower in the second. Highest rated items related to commitment to the community, and the least favorable reflected perceptions of racism in the larger community. Among the eight dimensions of community competence, social support, participation, communication, machinery for decision-making, and management of relations with larger society all had significantly lower scores in the second survey. The results of this study will aid in the delivery of culturally-appropriate health promotion and preventive care to Hispanic Appalachians and will expand the community's capacity to address the issue of diabetes through health advocacy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.