Collecting Data By Telephone From Urban African Americans With Hypertension: Characteristics of the Easy to Reach

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161252
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Collecting Data By Telephone From Urban African Americans With Hypertension: Characteristics of the Easy to Reach
Abstract:
Collecting Data By Telephone From Urban African Americans With Hypertension: Characteristics of the Easy to Reach
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Artinian, Nancy, PhD, RN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:CON - Room 344 Cohn Building, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Co-Authors:D. Denison and C.K. Nordstrom, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
Background: Despite the advantages of collecting data by telephone interview, investigators have reported difficulties with this data collection mode. However, few investigators have described the nature of these difficulties and/or the resources needed to overcome these difficulties. Specific Aim: The purpose of this research was to describe some of the issues associated with collecting follow-up data by telephone from a sample of urban African Americans with hypertension. Methods: Data for these analyses were collected as part of a larger randomized clinical trial to test the hypothesis that individuals who participate in usual care plus blood pressure (BP) telemonitoring will have a greater reduction in BP from baseline at 3-months follow-up than individuals who receive usual care only. Data about changes in hypertensive medications and in medication dosing were collected by four telephone calls to 368 participants over the course of one year. Two questions were asked at each call, which on average, were 5 minutes in length. Results: Fifty-five (15.0%) participants had at least one phone number change and 75 (20.4%) had their telephone disconnected. The number of attempted telephone calls/participant over the year study period ranged from 1 to 21 with a mean of 9.5 times (+/- 4.0). Rates of completed calls at each call period ranged from 63.3% to 70.3%; only 38.3% of the participants were reached at all four call periods. Those who were easy to reach (n = 170, 46%) (required equal to or less than 8 calls over the course of a year to acquire data) were older ( t = 3.0, p =.003), female ( X2 = 4.6, p = 0.03), and currently working (X2 = 7.9, p = .005). Discussion: The majority of urban African Americans with hypertension in this sample were difficult to reach by telephone although completion rates in this sample were better than or comparable to response rates reported by other investigators.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollecting Data By Telephone From Urban African Americans With Hypertension: Characteristics of the Easy to Reachen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161252-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Collecting Data By Telephone From Urban African Americans With Hypertension: Characteristics of the Easy to Reach</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Artinian, Nancy, PhD, RN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON - Room 344 Cohn Building, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">n.artinian@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D. Denison and C.K. Nordstrom, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Despite the advantages of collecting data by telephone interview, investigators have reported difficulties with this data collection mode. However, few investigators have described the nature of these difficulties and/or the resources needed to overcome these difficulties. Specific Aim: The purpose of this research was to describe some of the issues associated with collecting follow-up data by telephone from a sample of urban African Americans with hypertension. Methods: Data for these analyses were collected as part of a larger randomized clinical trial to test the hypothesis that individuals who participate in usual care plus blood pressure (BP) telemonitoring will have a greater reduction in BP from baseline at 3-months follow-up than individuals who receive usual care only. Data about changes in hypertensive medications and in medication dosing were collected by four telephone calls to 368 participants over the course of one year. Two questions were asked at each call, which on average, were 5 minutes in length. Results: Fifty-five (15.0%) participants had at least one phone number change and 75 (20.4%) had their telephone disconnected. The number of attempted telephone calls/participant over the year study period ranged from 1 to 21 with a mean of 9.5 times (+/- 4.0). Rates of completed calls at each call period ranged from 63.3% to 70.3%; only 38.3% of the participants were reached at all four call periods. Those who were easy to reach (n = 170, 46%) (required equal to or less than 8 calls over the course of a year to acquire data) were older ( t = 3.0, p =.003), female ( X2 = 4.6, p = 0.03), and currently working (X2 = 7.9, p = .005). Discussion: The majority of urban African Americans with hypertension in this sample were difficult to reach by telephone although completion rates in this sample were better than or comparable to response rates reported by other investigators.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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