2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161253
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Care of Chronic Illness: The Good, the Normal, and the Ordinary
Abstract:
Family Care of Chronic Illness: The Good, the Normal, and the Ordinary
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Ayres, Lioness, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 50 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Co-Authors:T. Tripp-Reimer, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; K. Knafl, School of Nursing, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR; and R. Roberta, School of Nursing, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
In the past, research with families of children with chronic illnesses and caregivers of dependent elders often emphasized negative aspects of the experience and/or negative outcomes for families and caregivers. More recently, family researchers in particular have advocated against such deficit models and recommended understanding family strengths while caregiver researchers have begun to describe caregivers in terms of their skills and abilities. Researchers across the lifespan have identified the meaning families and caregivers make of their experiences as an important source of strength. Past research has identified a number of concepts that address family strengths in the context of health care challenges (e.g. normalization, resilience). The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize and describe meanings made by families and caregivers that emphasize the positive aspects of experience, and to identify contextual factors that support these meanings. Findings are derived from a secondary analysis of qualitative data collected by four different researchers and their research teams. These data include studies of families with medically fragile, technology dependent children, families of children with HIV/AIDS, families of children with genetic conditions, and family caregivers of chronically ill and frail elders. Data were collected in Asia, in Jordan, and among Asian-American, Jordanian-American, Native American, African-American and European-American, and Hispanic families.. Findings from this analysis, which employs both data and investigator triangulation, identify three kinds of meaning in the family care of chronic illness: life as normal, life as good but not necessarily normal, and life as ordinary although not necessarily good or normal. The analysis addresses the similarities and differences in these meanings and their implications for conceptualizating family response to illness. These findings have implications both for clinicians, who can help families and caregivers to build on these strengths, and for researchers who seek to explain differences in outcomes among families and caregivers of persons with chronic illness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Care of Chronic Illness: The Good, the Normal, and the Ordinaryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161253-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Care of Chronic Illness: The Good, the Normal, and the Ordinary</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ayres, Lioness, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 50 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lioness-ayres@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">T. Tripp-Reimer, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; K. Knafl, School of Nursing, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR; and R. Roberta, School of Nursing, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In the past, research with families of children with chronic illnesses and caregivers of dependent elders often emphasized negative aspects of the experience and/or negative outcomes for families and caregivers. More recently, family researchers in particular have advocated against such deficit models and recommended understanding family strengths while caregiver researchers have begun to describe caregivers in terms of their skills and abilities. Researchers across the lifespan have identified the meaning families and caregivers make of their experiences as an important source of strength. Past research has identified a number of concepts that address family strengths in the context of health care challenges (e.g. normalization, resilience). The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize and describe meanings made by families and caregivers that emphasize the positive aspects of experience, and to identify contextual factors that support these meanings. Findings are derived from a secondary analysis of qualitative data collected by four different researchers and their research teams. These data include studies of families with medically fragile, technology dependent children, families of children with HIV/AIDS, families of children with genetic conditions, and family caregivers of chronically ill and frail elders. Data were collected in Asia, in Jordan, and among Asian-American, Jordanian-American, Native American, African-American and European-American, and Hispanic families.. Findings from this analysis, which employs both data and investigator triangulation, identify three kinds of meaning in the family care of chronic illness: life as normal, life as good but not necessarily normal, and life as ordinary although not necessarily good or normal. The analysis addresses the similarities and differences in these meanings and their implications for conceptualizating family response to illness. These findings have implications both for clinicians, who can help families and caregivers to build on these strengths, and for researchers who seek to explain differences in outcomes among families and caregivers of persons with chronic illness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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