Examining Fatigue and Factors Associated With Fatigue During Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapy in the Control Group Within a Randomized Clinical Trial

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161256
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining Fatigue and Factors Associated With Fatigue During Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapy in the Control Group Within a Randomized Clinical Trial
Abstract:
Examining Fatigue and Factors Associated With Fatigue During Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapy in the Control Group Within a Randomized Clinical Trial
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Berger, Ann, PhD, RN, AOCN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:U of Nebraska Med Center
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 9853330 NE MED CENTER, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Co-Authors:J. Chamberlain, M. Roh, P. Fischer, L. Farr, and S. Agrawal, College of Nursing, U of Nebraska Med Center, Omaha, NE
Fatigue is the most frequent and distressing symptom reported by women receiving adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy. Several randomized clinical trials (RCTs) provided evidence that regular exercise is associated with lower fatigue during treatment, but little is known about other factors influence on fatigue. The purpose is to examine fatigue and other factors during adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy treatments (Rx) in the control group within a RCT. Equal time and attention and healthy-eating content was delivered; n = 86, post-operative, with Stage I-IIIA breast cancer; mean age = 52.8(30-83); most married and employed. Piper's Integrated Fatigue Model guided the study. Instruments: Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), MOS (SF-36), Symptom Experience Scale (SES). Analyses included descriptives, Spearman correlations, & backwards regressions. Baseline scores revealed mild fatigue [2.54(2.03)], poor sleep quality [6.8(3.6)], mild anxiety [9.4(2.36)], depression [8.61(1.48)], low physical functioning [67.9(24.8)], and mild symptom burden (nausea, appetite, bowels, pain, concentration, appearance). Fatigue was correlated (p<0.05) at Rx 1 - 4 with baseline low physical functioning, high anxiety, poor sleep quality, and gastro-intestinal symptoms. Backward regressions determined baseline values of factors associated with higher fatigue at each Rx (R2 =.10-.31, (p<.05) included: Rx1: low physical functioning, & burden of nausea & appearance; Rx2: burden of nausea and bowels; Rx3: high anxiety and poor sleep quality; Rx4: burden of nausea, bowels, & concentration. Backward regressions found factors from the prior Rx that predicted higher fatigue at the next Rx: Rx2: poor sleep quality; Rx3: burden of nausea & concentration; Rx4: high anxiety & burden of bowels; (p<.05). To summarize, the control group experienced fatigue associated with several factors, particularly symptoms (i.e. nausea, appearance, bowels, and concentration). Even if assessed, less than optimal symptom management occurs. Busy oncology clinics need to standardize methods to assess and treat fatigue, sleep disturbances, other symptoms, & anxiety & integrate promotion of regular exercise into clinical cancer care practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining Fatigue and Factors Associated With Fatigue During Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapy in the Control Group Within a Randomized Clinical Trialen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161256-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examining Fatigue and Factors Associated With Fatigue During Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapy in the Control Group Within a Randomized Clinical Trial</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Berger, Ann, PhD, RN, AOCN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">U of Nebraska Med Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 9853330 NE MED CENTER, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aberger@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J. Chamberlain, M. Roh, P. Fischer, L. Farr, and S. Agrawal, College of Nursing, U of Nebraska Med Center, Omaha, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Fatigue is the most frequent and distressing symptom reported by women receiving adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy. Several randomized clinical trials (RCTs) provided evidence that regular exercise is associated with lower fatigue during treatment, but little is known about other factors influence on fatigue. The purpose is to examine fatigue and other factors during adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy treatments (Rx) in the control group within a RCT. Equal time and attention and healthy-eating content was delivered; n = 86, post-operative, with Stage I-IIIA breast cancer; mean age = 52.8(30-83); most married and employed. Piper's Integrated Fatigue Model guided the study. Instruments: Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), MOS (SF-36), Symptom Experience Scale (SES). Analyses included descriptives, Spearman correlations, &amp; backwards regressions. Baseline scores revealed mild fatigue [2.54(2.03)], poor sleep quality [6.8(3.6)], mild anxiety [9.4(2.36)], depression [8.61(1.48)], low physical functioning [67.9(24.8)], and mild symptom burden (nausea, appetite, bowels, pain, concentration, appearance). Fatigue was correlated (p&lt;0.05) at Rx 1 - 4 with baseline low physical functioning, high anxiety, poor sleep quality, and gastro-intestinal symptoms. Backward regressions determined baseline values of factors associated with higher fatigue at each Rx (R2 =.10-.31, (p&lt;.05) included: Rx1: low physical functioning, &amp; burden of nausea &amp; appearance; Rx2: burden of nausea and bowels; Rx3: high anxiety and poor sleep quality; Rx4: burden of nausea, bowels, &amp; concentration. Backward regressions found factors from the prior Rx that predicted higher fatigue at the next Rx: Rx2: poor sleep quality; Rx3: burden of nausea &amp; concentration; Rx4: high anxiety &amp; burden of bowels; (p&lt;.05). To summarize, the control group experienced fatigue associated with several factors, particularly symptoms (i.e. nausea, appearance, bowels, and concentration). Even if assessed, less than optimal symptom management occurs. Busy oncology clinics need to standardize methods to assess and treat fatigue, sleep disturbances, other symptoms, &amp; anxiety &amp; integrate promotion of regular exercise into clinical cancer care practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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