New Mothers Network: The Development and Evaluation of a Social Support Internet Intervention for Single, Low-Income, African American Mothers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161257
Type:
Presentation
Title:
New Mothers Network: The Development and Evaluation of a Social Support Internet Intervention for Single, Low-Income, African American Mothers
Abstract:
New Mothers Network: The Development and Evaluation of a Social Support Internet Intervention for Single, Low-Income, African American Mothers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Campbell-Grossman, Christie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:UNMC
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 319 Commerce Court, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0220, USA
Co-Authors:D. Brage Hudson, C. Campbell-Grossman, and R. Keating-Lefler, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE
The number of single, low-income, African American mothers has become increasingly prevalent during the past 20 years. Single parenting challenges are compounded when social support is limited for mothers. Purposes of this study were to describe (a) the development of a theoretically based social support intervention, the New Mothers Network (NMN), for improving single, low-income, African American mothers' health and parenting abilities and (b) mothers' and community leaders' evaluations of the intervention. Social support theory provided the basis for the development of the NMN (House, 1981; Revenson, Schiffano, Majerovitz, & Gibofsky, 1991). Focus group methodology was used with one group of single, low-income mothers (n=5) and two groups of community leaders (n=16). Community leaders' expertise was professional assistance to mothers. The development of the NMN occurred in four stages. First, the Young Parents Project, an earlier version of the NMN, served as the basis for the NMN (Hudson, Elek, Westfall, Grabau, & Fleck, 1999). Second, 3 social support theory experts were consulted about the rationale for intervention components and linkages between social support theory concepts. Third, needs, concerns, and social support mechanisms of single, low-income mothers during the transition to parenthood from the perspective of mothers and community leaders were reported and used to develop the NMN (Campbell-Grossman, Hudson, Keating-Lefler, & Fleck, 2005; Keating-Lefler, Hudson, Campbell-Grossman, Fleck, & Westfall, 2004). Fourth, a literature review and discussion with research experts supported tailoring the NMN for single, low-income, African American mothers instead of mothers from various cultural groups. Mothers' and community leaders' evaluations of the NMN during the focus group discussion resulted in themes about the development of the NMN. Investigators should (a) describe purposes of health and social resources and how to access these resources in the community, (b) emphasize information about infant care, (c) provide a developmentally appropriate intervention, and (d) incorporate culturally sensitive information. The NMN may be an effective social support intervention for improving single, low-income mothers' health and parenting abilities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNew Mothers Network: The Development and Evaluation of a Social Support Internet Intervention for Single, Low-Income, African American Mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161257-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">New Mothers Network: The Development and Evaluation of a Social Support Internet Intervention for Single, Low-Income, African American Mothers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Campbell-Grossman, Christie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UNMC</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 319 Commerce Court, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0220, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ccampbel@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D. Brage Hudson, C. Campbell-Grossman, and R. Keating-Lefler, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The number of single, low-income, African American mothers has become increasingly prevalent during the past 20 years. Single parenting challenges are compounded when social support is limited for mothers. Purposes of this study were to describe (a) the development of a theoretically based social support intervention, the New Mothers Network (NMN), for improving single, low-income, African American mothers' health and parenting abilities and (b) mothers' and community leaders' evaluations of the intervention. Social support theory provided the basis for the development of the NMN (House, 1981; Revenson, Schiffano, Majerovitz, &amp; Gibofsky, 1991). Focus group methodology was used with one group of single, low-income mothers (n=5) and two groups of community leaders (n=16). Community leaders' expertise was professional assistance to mothers. The development of the NMN occurred in four stages. First, the Young Parents Project, an earlier version of the NMN, served as the basis for the NMN (Hudson, Elek, Westfall, Grabau, &amp; Fleck, 1999). Second, 3 social support theory experts were consulted about the rationale for intervention components and linkages between social support theory concepts. Third, needs, concerns, and social support mechanisms of single, low-income mothers during the transition to parenthood from the perspective of mothers and community leaders were reported and used to develop the NMN (Campbell-Grossman, Hudson, Keating-Lefler, &amp; Fleck, 2005; Keating-Lefler, Hudson, Campbell-Grossman, Fleck, &amp; Westfall, 2004). Fourth, a literature review and discussion with research experts supported tailoring the NMN for single, low-income, African American mothers instead of mothers from various cultural groups. Mothers' and community leaders' evaluations of the NMN during the focus group discussion resulted in themes about the development of the NMN. Investigators should (a) describe purposes of health and social resources and how to access these resources in the community, (b) emphasize information about infant care, (c) provide a developmentally appropriate intervention, and (d) incorporate culturally sensitive information. The NMN may be an effective social support intervention for improving single, low-income mothers' health and parenting abilities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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