Exploration of Nursing Intensity in a Sample of Acute Care Cardiovascular Patients Using the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161258
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploration of Nursing Intensity in a Sample of Acute Care Cardiovascular Patients Using the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC)
Abstract:
Exploration of Nursing Intensity in a Sample of Acute Care Cardiovascular Patients Using the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Clarke, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Genesis Medical Center
Contact Address:Nursing Administration, Davenport, IA, 52803, USA
The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate the use of the NIC estimates of time and education level as determined by nursing experts associated with the Iowa Intervention Project and the nurses providing care for acute care cardiovascular patients. This study examined the frequency of selection, number of occurrences per shift and estimated time of 64 NIC interventions in a sample of 200 patients admitted to a Cardiovascular Interventional Unit in a Midwestern community hospital. Nurses selected NIC interventions from a predetermined list of sixty and were asked to self-report the number of times the intervention was used during the shift, estimate the average time each intervention took to complete, and identify the education level that was required to accomplish each intervention. A total of 10,645 NIC intervention selections were made during a one-month data collection period. Each NIC intervention was selected at least once with day shift documenting the most, followed by nights then evenings. The top 20 list of frequently selected NIC interventions contained 8,248 (77% of the total) of the selections. Three teaching NIC interventions and Vital Signs Monitoring were the most frequently selected NIC interventions. The number of occurrences for NIC interventions ranged from 1 to 30 with the mean number of occurrences of at least two per shift. Mean times for the NIC interventions ranged from 2.88 to 49.40 minutes with the majority of interventions requiring 5 to10 minutes. Confidence Intervals for the mean time for each NIC intervention were compared to the Iowa Intervention Project range for time, which was established in 15-minute intervals up to one hour. There are comparable mean times using 95% confidence intervals for seventeen (26.5% of the total) NIC interventions. The selection and number of occurrences of NIC interventions accurately described the work of the nurses caring for the cardiovascular patients in this study. Development of information systems that include nursing standardized languages such as NIC are necessary in order to determine intensity, effectively and efficiently allocate nursing resources and determine costs. These preliminary findings are useful to begin to study nursing intensity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploration of Nursing Intensity in a Sample of Acute Care Cardiovascular Patients Using the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161258-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploration of Nursing Intensity in a Sample of Acute Care Cardiovascular Patients Using the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clarke, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Genesis Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Administration, Davenport, IA, 52803, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">clarke@genesishealth.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate the use of the NIC estimates of time and education level as determined by nursing experts associated with the Iowa Intervention Project and the nurses providing care for acute care cardiovascular patients. This study examined the frequency of selection, number of occurrences per shift and estimated time of 64 NIC interventions in a sample of 200 patients admitted to a Cardiovascular Interventional Unit in a Midwestern community hospital. Nurses selected NIC interventions from a predetermined list of sixty and were asked to self-report the number of times the intervention was used during the shift, estimate the average time each intervention took to complete, and identify the education level that was required to accomplish each intervention. A total of 10,645 NIC intervention selections were made during a one-month data collection period. Each NIC intervention was selected at least once with day shift documenting the most, followed by nights then evenings. The top 20 list of frequently selected NIC interventions contained 8,248 (77% of the total) of the selections. Three teaching NIC interventions and Vital Signs Monitoring were the most frequently selected NIC interventions. The number of occurrences for NIC interventions ranged from 1 to 30 with the mean number of occurrences of at least two per shift. Mean times for the NIC interventions ranged from 2.88 to 49.40 minutes with the majority of interventions requiring 5 to10 minutes. Confidence Intervals for the mean time for each NIC intervention were compared to the Iowa Intervention Project range for time, which was established in 15-minute intervals up to one hour. There are comparable mean times using 95% confidence intervals for seventeen (26.5% of the total) NIC interventions. The selection and number of occurrences of NIC interventions accurately described the work of the nurses caring for the cardiovascular patients in this study. Development of information systems that include nursing standardized languages such as NIC are necessary in order to determine intensity, effectively and efficiently allocate nursing resources and determine costs. These preliminary findings are useful to begin to study nursing intensity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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