Meaning of the Good Life for Several Persons with Dementia Living in a Nursing Home

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161265
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Meaning of the Good Life for Several Persons with Dementia Living in a Nursing Home
Abstract:
Meaning of the Good Life for Several Persons with Dementia Living in a Nursing Home
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Twigg, Prudence
P.I. Institution Name:IUPUI
Contact Address:SON, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Co-Authors:Sharon Sims; Melinda Swenson
Within Western philosophical traditions, the possibility of achieving/enjoying the good life has been linked to cognitive capacity, leading to the assumption that persons with dementia (PWD) cannot experience meaningful life, particularly in institutions. The purpose of the study was to describe the meaning of the good life for several PWD living in a nursing home (NH). Ten persons with mild to moderate dementia were interviewed and asked to describe a good day at the NH and good times from earlier in their lives. Analysis was conducted using interpretive phenomenology, reading individually and across texts, and identifying elements of meaning. General accounts of "how things are or were" (semantic memories) were found to be remarkably well-preserved in PWD. Episodic memories of specific events were, as expected, diminished in PWD. Thirteen elements of the good life that met the criteria of occurring in more than one interview were identified. Within a coherence theory of truth (Sandelowski), semantic memories, creatively composed over a lifetime, are proposed to reflect the meaning of the good life for PWD in a NH: "staying connected" to self, others, and the outside community. The findings support the continuance of many current nursing interventions for this population (e.g. exercise programs, reminiscence therapy, support of family visits) but also indicate the need for more research in a relatively unexplored area, the desire of PWD for interaction with the world beyond the institution. The findings also demonstrate the continuing presence of meaningful life for PWD in the NH setting and provide a rich source of material for the education of families and nurses in the affective domain of learning. AN: MN030029
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeaning of the Good Life for Several Persons with Dementia Living in a Nursing Homeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161265-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Meaning of the Good Life for Several Persons with Dementia Living in a Nursing Home </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Twigg, Prudence </td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">IUPUI</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sharon Sims; Melinda Swenson</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Within Western philosophical traditions, the possibility of achieving/enjoying the good life has been linked to cognitive capacity, leading to the assumption that persons with dementia (PWD) cannot experience meaningful life, particularly in institutions. The purpose of the study was to describe the meaning of the good life for several PWD living in a nursing home (NH). Ten persons with mild to moderate dementia were interviewed and asked to describe a good day at the NH and good times from earlier in their lives. Analysis was conducted using interpretive phenomenology, reading individually and across texts, and identifying elements of meaning. General accounts of &quot;how things are or were&quot; (semantic memories) were found to be remarkably well-preserved in PWD. Episodic memories of specific events were, as expected, diminished in PWD. Thirteen elements of the good life that met the criteria of occurring in more than one interview were identified. Within a coherence theory of truth (Sandelowski), semantic memories, creatively composed over a lifetime, are proposed to reflect the meaning of the good life for PWD in a NH: &quot;staying connected&quot; to self, others, and the outside community. The findings support the continuance of many current nursing interventions for this population (e.g. exercise programs, reminiscence therapy, support of family visits) but also indicate the need for more research in a relatively unexplored area, the desire of PWD for interaction with the world beyond the institution. The findings also demonstrate the continuing presence of meaningful life for PWD in the NH setting and provide a rich source of material for the education of families and nurses in the affective domain of learning. AN: MN030029 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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