A Stage-Based Intervention to Promote Physical Activity in a Midwestern Nonmetropolitan Community

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161266
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Stage-Based Intervention to Promote Physical Activity in a Midwestern Nonmetropolitan Community
Abstract:
A Stage-Based Intervention to Promote Physical Activity in a Midwestern Nonmetropolitan Community
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Ulbrich, Sherri
Contact Address:SON, 622 North Lake Dr, Marshall, MO, 65340, USA
Physical activity is a powerful health behavior. Most persons do not meet activity requirements. This study tested a stage-based intervention to increase physical activity in adults living in a nonmetropolitan community. A practice theory of physical activity as self-care using Orem's Self-Care Deficit nursing theory and the Transtheoretical Model provided the conceptual framework. In a 3-group experimental design with repeated measures, healthy adults (N=116), ages 18 to 65, were assigned to 1 of 3 groups. The theory group received 3 monthly booklets based on their stage of change (SOC). The standard group received American Heart Association booklets. The control group received nothing. Activity, self-efficacy, and SOC were measured at 0, 1 and 3 months. The Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel, Chi-square, and Kruskal-Wallis One-Way ANOVA tests were used. No significant differences in self-efficacy (mean change -.45 to -.09, p=.39 and .4) or physical activity (mean change -1.22 to 4.67, p=.86 and .65) were found at 1 or 3 months. No statistically significant difference in (SOC) was found (p.=.13 and p=.1). However, more persons in the theory (39% and 40%) group progressed in SOC at both intervals than in the standard (22% and 25%) and control (24% and 26%) groups. Fewer persons in the theory (5% and 7%) and standard (5% and 6%) groups regressed than in the control (22% and 21%) group. This study supports the predictive value of the Transtheoretical Model, but demonstrates its limitations in guiding limited contact activity interventions. The predicted greater efficacy of a mailed, 3-month, stage-based intervention was not supported. However, the data suggest the stage-based intervention may have moved more persons through the stages of change and closer to changing behavior. Research using stronger and longer interventions is needed to fully evaluate the potential of the Transtheoretical Model. AN: MN030066
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Stage-Based Intervention to Promote Physical Activity in a Midwestern Nonmetropolitan Communityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161266-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Stage-Based Intervention to Promote Physical Activity in a Midwestern Nonmetropolitan Community </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ulbrich, Sherri</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 622 North Lake Dr, Marshall, MO, 65340, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Physical activity is a powerful health behavior. Most persons do not meet activity requirements. This study tested a stage-based intervention to increase physical activity in adults living in a nonmetropolitan community. A practice theory of physical activity as self-care using Orem's Self-Care Deficit nursing theory and the Transtheoretical Model provided the conceptual framework. In a 3-group experimental design with repeated measures, healthy adults (N=116), ages 18 to 65, were assigned to 1 of 3 groups. The theory group received 3 monthly booklets based on their stage of change (SOC). The standard group received American Heart Association booklets. The control group received nothing. Activity, self-efficacy, and SOC were measured at 0, 1 and 3 months. The Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel, Chi-square, and Kruskal-Wallis One-Way ANOVA tests were used. No significant differences in self-efficacy (mean change -.45 to -.09, p=.39 and .4) or physical activity (mean change -1.22 to 4.67, p=.86 and .65) were found at 1 or 3 months. No statistically significant difference in (SOC) was found (p.=.13 and p=.1). However, more persons in the theory (39% and 40%) group progressed in SOC at both intervals than in the standard (22% and 25%) and control (24% and 26%) groups. Fewer persons in the theory (5% and 7%) and standard (5% and 6%) groups regressed than in the control (22% and 21%) group. This study supports the predictive value of the Transtheoretical Model, but demonstrates its limitations in guiding limited contact activity interventions. The predicted greater efficacy of a mailed, 3-month, stage-based intervention was not supported. However, the data suggest the stage-based intervention may have moved more persons through the stages of change and closer to changing behavior. Research using stronger and longer interventions is needed to fully evaluate the potential of the Transtheoretical Model. AN: MN030066 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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