Barriers That Prevent Participation in Community Services Among Those With Alzheimer's Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161269
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Barriers That Prevent Participation in Community Services Among Those With Alzheimer's Disease
Abstract:
Barriers That Prevent Participation in Community Services Among Those With Alzheimer's Disease
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Ward-Smith, Peggy
Contact Address:SON, 2220 Holmes, Kansas City, MO, 43210, USA
Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a chronic, disabling and eventually fatal disease that affects four million adults in the United States. With an ever-increasing number of family members providing care for those with AD, there is growing interest the use of community services. Research results found that among those with mild or moderate AD, community services are utilized 18% of the time. The purpose of this qualitative study was to uncover barriers that prevent family members of those with AD from utilizing community services. Using US Census data, study subjects were classified into urban (8 participants) and rural (8 participants) settings. Eighteen family members of individuals (12 female and 6 male) diagnosed with AD within the previous six months were interviewed. Data was transcribed and analyzed utilizing the software program HyperRESEARCH. Coding of the textual data extracted 310 significant statements. These statements were collapsed into three themes: (1) pivotal events that lead to medical intervention; (2) obtaining the diagnosis, and (3) plans for the future. Results of this study demonstrate that the geographical location has no impact on barriers toward utilizing community services. Family members relied on the opinion of the health care professional caring for their family member, and only when a major pivotal event occurred, did they seek medical intervention. Nurses are in a prime position to assess and recommend AD screening. Earlier diagnosis can enhance the quality of life for those with AD and symptomatic treatment is available through medication. Earlier diagnosis will allow the person with AD to make treatment and end-of-life decisions. Some may find solace in ignorance, but the case for vigilance is getting stronger. AN: MN030090
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBarriers That Prevent Participation in Community Services Among Those With Alzheimer's Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161269-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Barriers That Prevent Participation in Community Services Among Those With Alzheimer's Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ward-Smith, Peggy</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 2220 Holmes, Kansas City, MO, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Alzheimer&rsquo;s Disease (AD) is a chronic, disabling and eventually fatal disease that affects four million adults in the United States. With an ever-increasing number of family members providing care for those with AD, there is growing interest the use of community services. Research results found that among those with mild or moderate AD, community services are utilized 18% of the time. The purpose of this qualitative study was to uncover barriers that prevent family members of those with AD from utilizing community services. Using US Census data, study subjects were classified into urban (8 participants) and rural (8 participants) settings. Eighteen family members of individuals (12 female and 6 male) diagnosed with AD within the previous six months were interviewed. Data was transcribed and analyzed utilizing the software program HyperRESEARCH. Coding of the textual data extracted 310 significant statements. These statements were collapsed into three themes: (1) pivotal events that lead to medical intervention; (2) obtaining the diagnosis, and (3) plans for the future. Results of this study demonstrate that the geographical location has no impact on barriers toward utilizing community services. Family members relied on the opinion of the health care professional caring for their family member, and only when a major pivotal event occurred, did they seek medical intervention. Nurses are in a prime position to assess and recommend AD screening. Earlier diagnosis can enhance the quality of life for those with AD and symptomatic treatment is available through medication. Earlier diagnosis will allow the person with AD to make treatment and end-of-life decisions. Some may find solace in ignorance, but the case for vigilance is getting stronger. AN: MN030090 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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