2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161271
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Moms in the NICU: Outsider to Partner
Abstract:
Moms in the NICU: Outsider to Partner
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Wilson, Margaret
Contact Address:CON, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Co-Authors:Judith A. Heermann; Patricia A. Wilhelm
The emerging care delivery model for Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) is family-focused, developmentally supportive care that requires nurses to think and act in ways that are often contrary to long-held practices. The voice of parents can provide additional perspectives in the process of modifying and refining care practices. Mothers begin their experience of parenthood in an artificial environment. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and describe mothers' experience while their infants were receiving care in the NICU. A qualitative research design based on Spradley's model was used. Fifteen mothers whose infants were receiving care in a Level III NICU were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using Spradley's domain analysis approach. Mother's participation in care (taking on the role of a parent) occurred along a continuum from "outsider" to "engaged parent" to "partnering". This continuum included 1) "the nurses' baby" to "my baby"; 2) "observer of care" to "advocate for baby's care"; 3) "passive role" to an "active role; and 4) "primary focus on the NICU, its technology and staff" to a "primary focus on their baby." Mothers entered the continuum at different points and moved at different rates toward "engaged parenting". The final stage of the continuum, "partnering," required the active participation of the staff. Nurses can facilitate the movement from "outsider" to "engaged parent". Mothers' participation in care and parental role development evolve in predictable phases that are influenced by prior experiences, infant health status, and the culture of the NICU. The final stage of parental role development where the mothers and nurses partner to plan and deliver care is the ultimate goal of the family focused developmental care. The results of this study can be used in implementation and evaluation plans for NICUs moving to family-focused developmental care. AN: MN030225
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMoms in the NICU: Outsider to Partneren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161271-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Moms in the NICU: Outsider to Partner </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilson, Margaret</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith A. Heermann; Patricia A. Wilhelm </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The emerging care delivery model for Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) is family-focused, developmentally supportive care that requires nurses to think and act in ways that are often contrary to long-held practices. The voice of parents can provide additional perspectives in the process of modifying and refining care practices. Mothers begin their experience of parenthood in an artificial environment. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and describe mothers' experience while their infants were receiving care in the NICU. A qualitative research design based on Spradley's model was used. Fifteen mothers whose infants were receiving care in a Level III NICU were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using Spradley's domain analysis approach. Mother's participation in care (taking on the role of a parent) occurred along a continuum from &quot;outsider&quot; to &quot;engaged parent&quot; to &quot;partnering&quot;. This continuum included 1) &quot;the nurses' baby&quot; to &quot;my baby&quot;; 2) &quot;observer of care&quot; to &quot;advocate for baby's care&quot;; 3) &quot;passive role&quot; to an &quot;active role; and 4) &quot;primary focus on the NICU, its technology and staff&quot; to a &quot;primary focus on their baby.&quot; Mothers entered the continuum at different points and moved at different rates toward &quot;engaged parenting&quot;. The final stage of the continuum, &quot;partnering,&quot; required the active participation of the staff. Nurses can facilitate the movement from &quot;outsider&quot; to &quot;engaged parent&quot;. Mothers' participation in care and parental role development evolve in predictable phases that are influenced by prior experiences, infant health status, and the culture of the NICU. The final stage of parental role development where the mothers and nurses partner to plan and deliver care is the ultimate goal of the family focused developmental care. The results of this study can be used in implementation and evaluation plans for NICUs moving to family-focused developmental care. AN: MN030225 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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