2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161274
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Knowledge Among Oncology Nurses
Abstract:
Knowledge Among Oncology Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Workman, Linda
Contact Address: Acute Care, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, 44106-4904, USA
Co-Authors:Judy DePalma
Problem/Purpose: Advances in genetics confirm genetic predisposition for diverse health problems. Nurses at every level will be involved with the study or care of individuals/families with genetic disorders, genetic predispositions, or who are undergoing genetic testing. Unfortunately, nursing literature exposes the absence of genetics content in BSN and MSN curricula nation-wide. Nursing programs lack faculty with sufficient expertise to incorporate substantial genetics content into basic and graduate nursing education or to use genetics information in nursing research. The purpose of this project was to determine level of genetics knowledge among oncology nurses. Conceptual framework: This project used an educational framework to assess the extent/depth of genetics knowledge within a nursing specialty. Subjects: Subjects were 812 members of the Oncology Nursing Society who attended a national conference. Most subjects had 10 years or more experience in oncology nursing. All levels of nursing education were represented. Method: A 20 item genetics knowledge survey was developed by genetic and oncology experts. Ten items represented general genetics content and ten items were specific for cancer genetics content. Items varied in degree of difficulty from 0.87 to 0.09. Guessing was discouraged by the use of "don't know/not sure" as a response choice for all items. Results: No single item was answered correctly by all participants. Correct responses for the 20 items ranged from 5.3% (42/812) to 87.6% (689/812). Only three items had the correct answer selected by at least 70% of the participants. MSN prepared nurses had slightly higher scores for cancer genetics knowledge. General genetic knowledge scores did not correlate with advanced degrees or years of nursing experience. Conclusions: Oncology nurses have deficits in basic and cancer genetic knowledge. Such deficits should be corrected to improve practice and use genetic testing or genetic counseling in nursing research. AN: MN030181
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKnowledge Among Oncology Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161274-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Knowledge Among Oncology Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Workman, Linda</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value"> Acute Care, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judy DePalma</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem/Purpose: Advances in genetics confirm genetic predisposition for diverse health problems. Nurses at every level will be involved with the study or care of individuals/families with genetic disorders, genetic predispositions, or who are undergoing genetic testing. Unfortunately, nursing literature exposes the absence of genetics content in BSN and MSN curricula nation-wide. Nursing programs lack faculty with sufficient expertise to incorporate substantial genetics content into basic and graduate nursing education or to use genetics information in nursing research. The purpose of this project was to determine level of genetics knowledge among oncology nurses. Conceptual framework: This project used an educational framework to assess the extent/depth of genetics knowledge within a nursing specialty. Subjects: Subjects were 812 members of the Oncology Nursing Society who attended a national conference. Most subjects had 10 years or more experience in oncology nursing. All levels of nursing education were represented. Method: A 20 item genetics knowledge survey was developed by genetic and oncology experts. Ten items represented general genetics content and ten items were specific for cancer genetics content. Items varied in degree of difficulty from 0.87 to 0.09. Guessing was discouraged by the use of &quot;don't know/not sure&quot; as a response choice for all items. Results: No single item was answered correctly by all participants. Correct responses for the 20 items ranged from 5.3% (42/812) to 87.6% (689/812). Only three items had the correct answer selected by at least 70% of the participants. MSN prepared nurses had slightly higher scores for cancer genetics knowledge. General genetic knowledge scores did not correlate with advanced degrees or years of nursing experience. Conclusions: Oncology nurses have deficits in basic and cancer genetic knowledge. Such deficits should be corrected to improve practice and use genetic testing or genetic counseling in nursing research. AN: MN030181 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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