2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161275
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Role of Social Support Groups in Breast Cancer Recovery
Abstract:
The Role of Social Support Groups in Breast Cancer Recovery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Zunkel, Gretchen
Contact Address:SON, 6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Ave, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
1. Background: Breast cancer support groups are thought to help patients adapt to a life-threatening illness. One research study found that a support group improved the length of survival for women after a breast cancer diagnosis. This has led to some misconceptions about the expectations that women, their families, and friends, hold about support groups. Individual differences may exist as to the beneficial effects of a support group for all women diagnosed with breast cancer. Theoretical Framework: Social support and self-regulation are important factors in the recovery process from a breast cancer diagnosis. Two types of support, emotional and educational support, are often obtained within the context of a support group. Self-regulation is a process that recognizes the habitual and reasoned determinants of behavior change as well as taking into account an individual's unique understanding, personal representations, or meaning related to their health, and the need to recognize individual patterns of coping. Purpose: The purposes of this study were to attend sessions with pre-established support groups to: 1) determine the nature of the support received in the group; 2) better understand the types of information that women receive in the support group that help them in their individual response to breast cancer; and 3) explore the differences between groups with a professional leader and peer-led groups. Methods: The researcher attended breast cancer support groups as an observer to detail and document the processes taking place within the support group. Individual women who agreed to a more extensive interview were contacted and interviewed at a time outside the support group. A questionnaire was distributed at the end of the support group to record confidential information and comments which were not elicited during the discussion. The data will be analyzed using qualitative methods and content analysis. AN: MN030356
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Role of Social Support Groups in Breast Cancer Recoveryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161275-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Role of Social Support Groups in Breast Cancer Recovery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zunkel, Gretchen</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Ave, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">1. Background: Breast cancer support groups are thought to help patients adapt to a life-threatening illness. One research study found that a support group improved the length of survival for women after a breast cancer diagnosis. This has led to some misconceptions about the expectations that women, their families, and friends, hold about support groups. Individual differences may exist as to the beneficial effects of a support group for all women diagnosed with breast cancer. Theoretical Framework: Social support and self-regulation are important factors in the recovery process from a breast cancer diagnosis. Two types of support, emotional and educational support, are often obtained within the context of a support group. Self-regulation is a process that recognizes the habitual and reasoned determinants of behavior change as well as taking into account an individual's unique understanding, personal representations, or meaning related to their health, and the need to recognize individual patterns of coping. Purpose: The purposes of this study were to attend sessions with pre-established support groups to: 1) determine the nature of the support received in the group; 2) better understand the types of information that women receive in the support group that help them in their individual response to breast cancer; and 3) explore the differences between groups with a professional leader and peer-led groups. Methods: The researcher attended breast cancer support groups as an observer to detail and document the processes taking place within the support group. Individual women who agreed to a more extensive interview were contacted and interviewed at a time outside the support group. A questionnaire was distributed at the end of the support group to record confidential information and comments which were not elicited during the discussion. The data will be analyzed using qualitative methods and content analysis. AN: MN030356 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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