2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161276
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Guided Imagery and Music
Abstract:
Effect of Guided Imagery and Music
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Albert, Rachel, PhD, RN
Title:Director and Associate Professor
Contact Address:Nursing, 23 University Drive, Fort Kent, ME, 04743, USA
Co-Authors:Derreth Roberts, MS, MSN, ARNP, Director; Ann Lak, MSN, RN, Director
Pain is a common chief concern of patients seeking emergency health care. Many patients may benefit from non-pharmacological pain relief interventions in addition to pharmacological therapies during painful procedures. Guided imagery and music (GIM) is a safe modality for pain and anxiety reduction. Purpose. The in-progress experimental pretest-posttest study investigates the effect of a combined GIM intervention on both sensory and affective components of acute pain and situational anxiety during laceration repair in the emergency department (ED). Framework. The acute pain management and the gate control theory provide the conceptual framework. Research Hypotheses. The hypotheses are that there will be a positive relationship between 1) pretest situational anxiety and pain sensation, and 2) between pretest situational anxiety and pain distress. Also, adults listening to a combination of GIM will report less posttest 3) pain sensation, 4) pain distress, and 5) and situational anxiety than those who do not. Methods. Using a completely randomized experimental design, a convenience sample of 155 adults presenting with uncomplicated lacerations to a medical center ED will be randomly assigned to a one of two groups: (1) GIM or (2) control. Subjects in the treatment group will listen to a combination of GIM that will begin with the first suture to the tying of the last. Pre- and posttest data will be collected via the situational anxiety, pain sensation, and pain distress 100- mm visual analogue scales. Analyses. Data analyses include use of partial correlation and multiple regressions. Implications for Practice These findings may support the need for nurses to assess patients for situational anxiety and pain distress in addition to pain sensation; and the addition of GIM may improve patients’ positive experience with pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Guided Imagery and Musicen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161276-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Guided Imagery and Music</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Albert, Rachel, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director and Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, 23 University Drive, Fort Kent, ME, 04743, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Derreth Roberts, MS, MSN, ARNP, Director; Ann Lak, MSN, RN, Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain is a common chief concern of patients seeking emergency health care. Many patients may benefit from non-pharmacological pain relief interventions in addition to pharmacological therapies during painful procedures. Guided imagery and music (GIM) is a safe modality for pain and anxiety reduction. Purpose. The in-progress experimental pretest-posttest study investigates the effect of a combined GIM intervention on both sensory and affective components of acute pain and situational anxiety during laceration repair in the emergency department (ED). Framework. The acute pain management and the gate control theory provide the conceptual framework. Research Hypotheses. The hypotheses are that there will be a positive relationship between 1) pretest situational anxiety and pain sensation, and 2) between pretest situational anxiety and pain distress. Also, adults listening to a combination of GIM will report less posttest 3) pain sensation, 4) pain distress, and 5) and situational anxiety than those who do not. Methods. Using a completely randomized experimental design, a convenience sample of 155 adults presenting with uncomplicated lacerations to a medical center ED will be randomly assigned to a one of two groups: (1) GIM or (2) control. Subjects in the treatment group will listen to a combination of GIM that will begin with the first suture to the tying of the last. Pre- and posttest data will be collected via the situational anxiety, pain sensation, and pain distress 100- mm visual analogue scales. Analyses. Data analyses include use of partial correlation and multiple regressions. Implications for Practice These findings may support the need for nurses to assess patients for situational anxiety and pain distress in addition to pain sensation; and the addition of GIM may improve patients&rsquo; positive experience with pain. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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